VANCOUVER AQUARIUM PHOTO Hardy is being given around the clock care at the rescue centre.

Rescued sea otter pup named Hardy

The pup was first brought to Port Hardy for treatment.

A sea otter pup rescued off the shores of Northern Vancouver Island has been named Hardy.

The sea otter pup was first brought to the District of Port Hardy for treatment, when a group of boaters spotted the lone pup following and calling out to their boat on June 25.

When the boaters arrived in Port Hardy they contacted the Department of Fisheries and Oceans, who then contacted the Vancouver Aquarium’s Marine Mammal Rescue Centre for help.

The Vancouver Aquarium held a contest to name the sea otter pup. Sarah Stregger submitted the winning submission ‘Hardy’ in honour of the place where the pup was rescued.

The rescue centre has since been providing 24-hour care for the pup, who was too young to survive on his own. Hardy was estimated to be only two to four weeks old when he was found.

“He’s doing very well since he’s come here,” said Lindsaye Akhurst manager of the Marine Mammal Rescue Centre. “Since he came here one month ago, he’s doubled his weight and he’s learning how to dive underwater.”

Akhurst says it’s uncertain why Hardy was separated from his mother. “It’s not uncommon for them to be separated for a short period of time, but it’s uncommon for them not to find each other again,” she said.

Akhurst said Hardy still needs 24-hour care and the rescue centre has staff and volunteers working around the clock to care for him.

“He’ll need 24-hour care until he can feed on his own, maintain his coat quality, and until we see an increase in his activity in the pool,” she added.

Hardy will remain in the care of the rescue centre until he is old enough for the Vancouver Aquarium and the DFO to better assess his situation, but Akhurst noted “sea otters of this age are not typically releasable” without a surrogate mother to provide care.

Each year the rescue centre cares for over 100 marine mammals and rehabilitates them for release, when possible. In addition to Hardy, they are currently caring for 54 harbour seals and two sea lions.