Hair today, gone tomorrow

Selfless acts like those of Hardy teen Sarah Case highlight the Tour de Rock's impact.

The cops will be on the case this weekend. More accurately, they’ll be relying on Sarah Case and the many other Vancouver Island supporters who are helping the Cops for Cancer Tour de Rock raise money to benefit childhood cancer victims and research.

The Tour begins, as always, on the North Island Saturday evening, with a welcome dinner and auction in Port Alice. The 22 riders will then put their months of training to the test Sunday morning when they ride to Port Hardy for an 11 a.m. community event at the Civic Centre.

From there, they’ll go on to Port McNeill, where a block party awaits at Black Bear Resort beginning at 3:15 p.m.

Plenty of fun and games are in store, but the cause is serious. To get an idea how serious, consider the story of Port Hardy youth Miguel Catarata in this week’s Gazette (page 13).

No, Miguel does not have cancer. But his rare congenital condition, acquired at birth, has denied him an opportunity at a normal childhood and impacted his parents’ lives as well with countless trips to hospital.

This is the kind of life faced by childhood cancer victims and their families, and the cops are doing their part to ease the impact of the disease, if not eradicate it altogether.

Case, the 14-year-old, is giving up her hair for a wig and cash donations for to Tour. As she noted, she can always grow more. Good for her for recognizing not everybody can.