Got a licence and some time to spare?

The Volunteer Transportation Network is looking for drivers

The Volunteer Transportation Network is looking for a few good men and women with clean driver’s licences and some time to donate to help those in need of a ride.

The Volunteer Transportation Network (VTN) helps enhance the quality of life and contributes to the health and greater independence for North Island residents as a part of the overall transit strategy for the region.

Many of our VTN clients are individuals who have mobility challenges and senior citizens who are no longer able to drive.

VTN drivers transport clients to medical appointments, court appearances, banks, post office, prescription pick ups, food banks, and the grocery store, as well as to educational programs and training oportunities.

This service — partially funded by the Regional District of Mount Waddington, fundraisers and donations from refering agencies, clients and their families — was first implemented in December 2007 and is only provided within the Regional District of Mount Waddington.

The VTN Program provides eligible North Island residents access to a variety of services and local events that aren’t available in every community.

The overall vision of the VTN Program is to integrate clients residing in remote communitites where transit service is limited to the transit system.

Literally driving the program are VTN volunteers who use their personal vehicles to provide door-to-door service to clients who are not able to access regular public transit.

Making it more familiar and comfortable is the fact volunteers are dispatched from the community in which they live.

Training workshops, survival kits and a monthly reimbursements for the kilometers driven are provided for volunteer drivers.

The VTN is looking for volunteer drivers in Port Hardy, Coal Harbour and Fort Rupert.

Volunteer drivers must provide a driver’s abstract and complete a criminal record check before they begin to transport clients.

Interested volunteers are asked to call the Regional District of Mount Waddington’s transit coordinator, Mary Mavis, at the North Island Community Services Society office in Port McNeill at 250-956-3151.

Further information about the VTN Program is available on the North Island Community Services Society website at www.nicommunityservices.ca.

 

Just Posted

B.C. students send books to displaced students of Hornby Island school fire

Maple Ridge elementary school teacher says students learned about acts of kindness

North Island Tour De Rock rider Benjamin Leah leads team to Port Hardy

“You don’t have issues and problems when you look at these kids and how much they’re going through.”

PRACC Chair Fred Robertson happy with how windmill blade display turned out

“Rotary really stepped up, which was excellent.”

Island Foods renovates bottle depot and cans old bottle return system

“I don’t want people to spend the whole day here,” said Angela Taylor on Port McNeill’s bottle depot.

Yukon man facing new attempted murder charge in Port Alice exploding mail case

Leon Nepper, 73, is now facing one charge each of aggravated assault and attempted murder

Environment Canada confirms Ottawa area hit by two tornadoes Friday

At one point more than 200,000 hydro customers were blacked out

Whitecaps see playoff dreams fade after 2-1 loss to FC Dallas

Goal in 87th minute seals Vancouver’s fate

Trump drains oxygen from Trudeau foreign policy with PM, Freeland bound for UN

A lot has changed since the Liberals came to power in Canada in 2015

B.C. man fined $15,000, barred from trading securities for fraud

Larry Keith Davis used money from an investor to pay personal bills

Emergency crews investigate small sulphuric acid spill in Kootenays

IRM states a small volume of less than one cup and three dime-sized drips were leaked from carrier

Family, friends of B.C murder victim want killer sent back to max security facility

Group wants convicted murderer Walter Ramsay sent back to a maximum security facility

B.C. VIEWS: Looking under the hood of ICBC’s war on crashes

Is our accident rate really soaring, or is it inefficiency?

Most Read