Corrine Hunt of Alert Bay and Fort Rupert won the National Aboriginal Achievement Award for the Arts at the gala event in Edmonton

Corrine Hunt of Alert Bay and Fort Rupert won the National Aboriginal Achievement Award for the Arts at the gala event in Edmonton

Local artist nets national accolades

Corrine Hunt was honoured with the 2011 National Aboriginal Achievement Award for the Arts during a gala in Edmonton Mar. 11.

Corrine Hunt was honoured  with the 2011 National Aboriginal Achievement Award for the Arts during a gala in Edmonton Mar. 11.

“I was completely astounded at being awarded this Achievement in the Arts and to be included among so many great Aboriginal artists such as Daphne Odjig and Norval Morriseau,” Hunt said in an email from Dresden, Germany.

“I feel honoured to be recognized and feel a great responsibility to the roots of my culture and my two hometowns of Alert Bay and Fort Rupert.

“The event itself was fantastic, combining humour and gentle accolades for the exceptional recipients from business, education, health sciences, etc. It was a big thrill to hang out with Fred Saskamoose, the first aboriginal player in the National Hockey League. There was a youth luncheon scheduled where we met with students from the Edmonton area who asked a great deal of questions and inspired me with their spirit.”

Born in Alert Bay of Kwakiutl and Tlingit heritage, Hunt comes from a family of accomplished nationally and internationally recognized artists. She was inspired by her family’s art when she was a child, however she did not start her own career until she was a student at Simon Fraser University.

Within a year of beginning her career as an artist she was completely self-sufficient.

Among the more than 2,000 unique creations and concepts on her resume, Hunt co-designed the Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic medals. She also received the most innovative product award at the B.C. Home Show. Her “Raven and the Sun” creation received first prize at the Indian Arts and Crafts Festival in Vancouver.

Hunt has attended exhibitions of her art in Dusseldorf, Hamburg, Portland, Toronto, Vancouver, Victoria, and Whistler.

The organizers of the event said a 90-minute version of the NAAA is produced and will be broadcast nationally by two television networks, Global Television and Aboriginal Peoples Television (APTN) . The 18th Annual National Aboriginal Achievement Awards will air on Saturday, April 9, although the website schedules for APTN and Global had not yet listed the event when the Gazette went to press.