Ledge Point

Ledge Point

Don’t be afraid to step onto the Ledge

For those readers who don’t know where Ledge Point is, it is the point of land directly across the bay from Port McNeill.

For those readers who don’t know where Ledge Point is, it is the point of land directly across the bay from Port McNeill.

Were it not for this peninsula, about three kilometers in length, there would be no bay in Port McNeill and the entire place would be subject to the whims of the winds, tides and currents of Broughton Strait.

There is a gravel road that leads you along most of it and I love to go there to experience the “other side” of the bay and get a unique perspective of the town as well as follow a spur that wanders over to the north side of the point for views of Broughton Strait looking toward Pulteney Point Light Station.

I usually drive up the old gravel road about once a year to roam around and paint.

This year, although I found the road to be more hemmed in with brush, I trundled out there early in July and painted on the far side on a very windy day.

The painting shown here was done a week later from the rocky shore, immediately across from Port McNeill, on a wonderfully calm day.

I sat upon a huge (would you believe dry?) log and painted the panorama before me of Broughton Strait looking toward Haddington and Cormorant Islands.

It was exciting to paint there because I was constantly entertained by seaplanes, the ferry and a variety of yachts coming and going.

Some of the yachts were anchored in the bay and the voices emanating from them were a source of amusement. I do believe a few of them would be embarrassed to know how well sounds carry across bodies of water!

The location from which I was painting has been well used by Port McNeillians for many years and there was some evidence that it was recently enjoyed.

The main road leads right to it, while the previously mentioned spot is a spur off to the left just before you get to the end.

It is fun to go out there to picnic and explore the point.

As always, low tide is the best for enjoying the shoreline, but several words of caution about the road are in order.

Access to this road is almost directly across from Orca Sand and Gravel on the Western Logging Main.

If you are really fussy about small scratches on your brand new vehicle, beg or borrow an older one, since it is really hard to avoid the brush at the far end of the road. When you get about a hundred metres from the end of the road, check it out for pot holes.

It’s not a long walk from there to the ocean and may save you some serious manipulating.

However, don’t let me scare you! It’s worth the drive.

Take it slowly because it’s really close to home for folks from McNeill and, guaranteed, you will enjoy!