Top price is not always best buy

Kevin Black gives a spot of advice to golf enthusiasts.

You get what you pay for. Or do you?

For many avid male golfers the sensation of cracking open a brand new box of ProV1’s is similar to that of a lady seeing her engagement ring for the first time.

If this doesn’t describe you, then I’m sure you’ve been forced to watch impatiently as someone in in the group in front of you scours the bush for their ball as if they dropped a Rolex.

Nope, just a golf ball, most likely a ProV1, PENTA or any other brand of $6 tour-caliber ball.

After all, the pros play the best gear to get the most out of their game and any golfer out for more than a few giggles should too, right?

Not necessarily.

Sometimes expensive means better, sometimes it means different.

The trick is figuring out what’s right for you.

I can make this easy for some.

If you don’t notice any benefits by playing the expensive models, then they’re just not worth it.

If you regularly enjoy one of the mid-priced models but treat yourself once in awhile for good behavior, you might get better results by spending the extra 20 bucks on flowers for your wife.  Forgive me, for it is not my intent to tell you how to spend your money. But there are reasons.

Tour balls are designed to provide feel and control through increased backspin, which helps the ball stop closer to where it lands.

For those seeking extra distance, a ball with less spin would help and, as an added bonus, it could be easier to control.

I’m sure the possibility of zipping the ball back sounds exciting, but backspin comes with baggage and that particular luggage is called sidespin.

They work as a pair and are never separated.

Sidespin is like a puppy.

If well-trained, it’s what creates soft draws and butter-cuts. But let it off leash before it’s ready, and your ball will ignore your calls as it scampers aimlessly into the bush.

Determine the traits that are important to your game and we can find the ball that fits you best.

There is good news for those who prefer a tour ball but don’t have tour swing speed.

Until recently, the true benefits of tour-caliber balls could only be realized with swing speeds in excess of 105-mph, but balls like the Srixon Z-STAR S are made to provide tour ball performance with maximum distance for swing speeds under 100 mph.

Kevin Black is the CPGA golf pro and general manager at Seven Hills Golf and Country Club. Email your golf questions to him at kbgolf@live.ca.

 

Just Posted

Survey says: Port Hardy Fire Rescue deserves on-call pay

75 per cent of those surveyed were in favour of financial compensation for the fire department.

VIDEO: Incredible waves spotted at Cape Scott

Lighthouse keeper captures video of huricane force winds

Tyson’s Thoughts: Make Port Hardy great again with a new multiplex in 2018

Population growth means there should be more recreational activities for community members to enjoy.

VIDEO: Stormy weather at Storey’s Beach

Envirnoment Canada has issued a wind warning for Coastal British Columbia

RDMW pens letter asking Pacific Coastal to reconsider cancellations

Board raises concerns over loss of flights to the region

WATCH: Giant waves smash Ucluelet’s Amphitrite Point

Folks made their way to Ucluelet’s Amphitrite Point Lighthouse on Thursday, Jan.… Continue reading

WestJet appeals lost bid to scrap harassment lawsuit

Airline argues judge was wrong to have dismissed the company’s application to strike the legal action

Can U.S. border guards search your phone? Yes, and here’s how

Secretary of homeland security explains a new policy that let’s border guards check phones

‘Beautiful writer’ Nancy Richler dies of cancer in Vancouver hospital

Montreal-born author spent most of her adult life in B.C. as a fiction writer and novelist

Jury convicts spear-wielding Duncan man in 2015 Ladysmith RV park murder

Trever George Meers used a handmade spear to stab Rayna Johnson at the Campers Corners RV Park

Students frustrated by UBCO response to harassment allegations

Students on the Kelowna campus were unaware of resources and worried about lack of communication

Kervin’s Corner: Our region’s communities heavily rely on the forestry sector — Let’s not change that for now

“Any transition out of our forest-based economy would take years along with careful planning…”

Opinion: Dare to be smarter

Just say no works for more than just substance abuse

‘Sing Me a Song’ about B.C. for a chance at $1,000 contest prize

Entries due by March 30 for lieutenant-governor’s British Columbia-themed competition

Most Read