The North Island College faculty are using a variety of tools to ensure students enjoy the same innovative, quality education they’re used to, even when many classes are virtual.

North Island College faculty + new virtual world bring benefits for students

Courses delivered with innovation and value

For many post-secondary students, school will look different for the foreseeable future. Many classes will remain virtual, but others will include a combination of distance and in-person learning with health protocols to protect students and staff from COVID-19.

The good news is they’ll still enjoy the same excellent courses, programs, learning supports and instruction offered at larger colleges and universities, but in much smaller classes, notes Shirley Ackland, president of the North Island College Faculty Association. The result is a greater chance of success, now … and later.

NIC faculty are embracing new technologies to provide exceptional education opportunities for students in our region. Here’s a look at the benefits that come with a North Island education this year:

Innovative solutions, same great support: For courses not requiring in-person learning, digital delivery is unleashing a world of possibility for students. NIC classes foster learning through creative curriculum like break out digital teamwork sessions or video assignments.

“These aren’t two-hour lectures; we’re using technology to build community and encourage engagement,” Ackland says. “For those accustomed to in-person learning, it’s also important to know that connection between student and instructor is still there.”

NIC faculty will continue to provide math, research, and writing assistance to help students excel in their studies. “We have services available in all programs and across all regions,” says Erin McConomy, Coordinator of Peer Tutoring, Writing and Math Supports.

Affordable education: Anyone planning to attend college or university away from home knows the costs are far greater than tuition. Taking your first and second-year courses at home lets you save on expenses like accommodation. NIC students get great value for their education dollar by working with teaching-focused educators in small classes. Students taking university courses have the added confidence their credits will easily transfer across the province.

For high school students, NIC’s dual credit program lets them gain both graduation and first-year university credits, providing a leg up when entering university. And NIC faculty teach many free Adult Basic Education courses for those who want to upgrade.

New opportunities: Whether embarking on post-secondary education or exploring retraining possibilities in response to industry changes or COVID, NIC’s virtual programming opens diverse new offerings to communities that didn’t have them before.

While here in the North Island area, the smaller Port Hardy campus is well-known for its excellent Indigenous education and Adult Basic Education courses, for example, today, with so many classes delivered virtually, there’s no better time for students to try something new, at home!

“Check in with us and see what’s available,” Ackland says. “The world may have changed, but we’re still here – we’re helping our students make their dreams come true, and that’s pretty special.”

Start planning your future today at nic.bc.ca.

Post-secondary Education

 

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