Vote for your favourite contestant in the Miss BC People’s Choice Award

Vote for your favourite contestant in the Miss BC People’s Choice Award

Miss BC, Mrs.BC, and Miss, Teen BC pageant returns to Fort Langley June 29 - July 1, 2019.

Dozens of women and girls from across the province will gather at Fort Langley for the Miss, Mrs, and Miss Teen BC pageant June 29 – July 1, 2019.

The weekend focuses on self-development encouraging women to be the voices of their communities. The contestants advocate for a diverse spectrum of topics from embracing individuality, empowering women, mental health awareness, LGTBQ awareness, climate change, and more.

Vote for your favourite contestants in 2019 and become eligible to win a $100 gift card to Shoppers Drug Mart.

Voting ends at 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, June 26.

Check out the platforms for this year’s participants here.

READ MORE: INSIDE LOOK: Miss BC not just about tiaras and sashes

Get to know the participants from last year and their testimonies below.

Christine Jamieson, Miss BC 2018:

The Miss BC pageant has a huge positive impact on my life. Through the workshops they provide, I was able to gain the skills and confidence needed to follow my passion for making the world a better place.

At 16 years old, I started suffering from epilepsy, anxiety, and depression. I struggled with day-to-day tasks and lacked hope in my life. I now work with various organizations including the Centre for Epilepsy and Seizure Education in BC, the BC Epilepsy Society, Epilepsy Canada and the Canadian Epilepsy Alliance.

My goal is to create programs, increase education, increase funding, and work towards an epilepsy-free world. The Miss BC pageant has a huge positive impact on my life. I’ve now helped to raise over half a million dollars for epilepsy research. In Addition, the Miss BC pageant gave me the confidence to compete in Miss Canada and ultimately Miss Continents. Through the workshops they provide, I was able to gain the skills and confidence needed to follow my passion for making the world a better place.

Taylor Aller, Mrs. BC 2018 & Miss Congeniality:

If you were to have told me, a makeup-free woman who doesn’t believe in the pressures of media and the beauty industry, that I would win the title of Mrs. BC and Miss Congeniality—I wouldn’t have believed you. And to have won those titles with minimal makeup, no glitz, and glam—I would have thought you were nuts.

With that said, this past year of my reign has been full of impact. Being able to push the causes I believe in, funding classrooms through the Free To Be Talks body positivity program, and have a platform for good has been a weight I’m so grateful to hold with these titles. The past year hasn’t only been beneficial to my communities, but to me personally.

The Miss BC family has welcomed my non-traditional approach with open arms. They’ve encouraged me to grow, challenged me, and supported each and every initiative. This reign has been a precious part in my journey and I’m so thankful for every moment of it. I’m wishing all that and more for the next in line!

Michelle Ahmadi, Miss Teen BC:

When I was 10 years old, I didn’t want to go to school for fear of being taunted and bullied. Among the grade 6 boys, I was referred to as “Chewbacca” or “Blue Whale”. I never thought I could pull myself out of the pit of self-consciousness I put myself in.

I am humbled to say how far I have come in terms of my confidence and self-esteem. Being given the title of Miss Teen BC has been a privilege and this title means so much more than a crown. I have grasped the importance of living in confidence and using my platform to serve my community.

It was experiences like attending fashion shows to support the Covenant House or volunteering for Make-A-Wish that helped me gain a true understanding of what it means to be a community leader. And it was all the little girls who wanted to take a picture with me, the “princess” for me to realize not all princesses need a prince. And it was only one pageant that made me realize pageant sisters are sisters for life.

I am so grateful for this experience, and though I won’t be able to be Miss Teen BC forever, I will be able to hold onto these memories and wonderful life lessons I have learned by being given such a title.

Cheryl Schindler, Mrs. Charity BC

The Miss BC Pageant is a once in a lifetime experience. I learned so much from my time with the pageant, met amazing people, and gained self-confidence. At first, I thought that I was too old to participate but there are no boundaries about the Miss BC pageant. They promote beauty from within. It’s all about giving back to your community and what you can do to make our world a better place.

For more information, visit missbc.ca



baneet.braich@bpdigital.ca

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