A new campaign put forward by the BC Construction Association (BCCA) and its Builders Code partners work to decrease worksite harassment by saying “don’t be a tool.” (Screenshot)

B.C. anti-harassment campaign says ‘Don’t be a tool’

In honour of BC Construction Month, a new campaign addresses worksite harassment

A new campaign put forward by the BC Construction Association (BCCA) and its Builders Code partners is telling workers, “don’t be a tool” in honour of BC Construction month.

The humorous campaign aims to address worksite bullying, hazing and harassment often seen on construction sites.

Part of the campaign includes short, animated videos of bullying situations described by tradespeople across B.C. The videos aim to help change the conversation in an industry that is 95 per cent male.

READ MORE:New role created to mediate on-site harassment for construction employers

“There’s no question that the 180,000 tradespeople in BC’s construction workforce will recognize the real-life situations that informed this campaign,” said Chris Atchison, President, BCCA in a statement. “Our industry is keen to be more diverse across all demographics including age and gender, and while most employees are well aware of the behaviour that’s expected of them by their employers, you could say we’re working to remove all doubt about what’s acceptable on a worksite.”

ALSO READ:Four per cent of Canadian women report being sexually harassed in the workplace

The #DontBeATool campaign will be shared across social media templates as a part o the Builders Code’s initiation to set a better baseline code of conduct at construction sites.

“Right now, there are so many campaigns competing for our attention around the themes of workplace conduct, sexual harassment and gender equality that we needed to create something that would break through all the clutter and get noticed,” said Morgan Tierney, Managing Partner of Rethink, the communications agency which created the campaign.

“Using our cartoon character ‘tools’ allows us to look at a serious problem through an exaggerated, lighthearted lens, making the whole issue more approachable.

To learn more you can visit builderscode.ca

vnc.editorial@blackpress.ca


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