Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Minister of Finance Bill Morneau arrive in the Foyer of the House of Commons to table the Budget, on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Tuesday, March 19, 2019. (Justin Tang/The Canadian Press)

BUDGET 2019: Liberals to create national drug agency for pharmacare plan

Canada’s current patchwork of drug coverage is not well equipped to handle increasingly expensive drugs

The Trudeau Liberals’ new budget promises a new agency to buy drugs in bulk and cut Canadian medication costs, the first step toward a national drug plan.

In a sign of just how expensive pharmacare could be, the government is also promising to spend $500 million a year, starting in 2022, just on subsidizing drugs that treat rare diseases, which have few patients to split huge research and development costs.

The government said it intends to work with provinces, territories and other partners to develop the mandate for the national drug agency, with Health Canada to receive $35 million over four years starting in 2019-2020 to create an office to support the plan.

The budget also includes plans to create a national formulary, a list of drugs that have been evaluated for both efficacy and cost-effectiveness. Lower-tier governments now assess drugs on their own, duplicating much of the work.

Despite clear language in the budget on how the government eventually intends to move ahead on a pharmacare plan, a central question remains: how to pay for it.

A universal pharmacare plan does not appear affordable for Canada right now, said Rebekah Young, the director of fiscal and provincial economics for Scotiabank. She said adding such a plan to the government’s books without major tax hikes would require stronger growth than Canada sees even in the best of times.

Provinces do not have a lot of capacity to take on substantial new costs, she said, noting the parliamentary budget office has estimated the cost of a pharmacare plan at about $20 billion a year.

“The big question then becomes who is going to pay and how much?” she said. “That will definitely be a key feature of the summer debate when we head into the election.”

The federal New Democrats have promised that if elected, they would follow through on a universal pharmacare plan to respond to dramatic increases in prescription drug costs.

READ MORE: As deficit grows, feds spend on job retraining, home incentives

Over the past three decades, Canadians’ spending on medication has soared from $2.6 billion in 1985 to $33.7 billion in 2018. People take more drugs to manage more conditions than they used to — living longer, and better, but at considerable cost.

The Canadian Institute for Health Information says drugs are the fastest-growing component in health spending but that most people’s medication needs aren’t covered by public health insurance, unlike care provided in hospitals and through visits to the doctor.

Canada’s current patchwork of drug coverage — including more than 100 public programs and 100,000 private insurance plans — is not well equipped to handle the increasingly expensive drugs now coming to market, the government said in its budget document.

“Absorbing these rising costs is difficult for individual Canadians and their families — and poses challenges to the long-term sustainability of government- and employer-sponsored drug plans,” it said.

The steps toward pharmacare contained in Tuesday’s budget follow interim findings issued by a federal expert panel led by former Ontario health minister Eric Hoskins.

It recently issued a report on the “building blocks” of pharmacare, including a recommendation that Ottawa oversee an agency to roll out a national drug plan.

The interim report said drug spending in Canada is expected to surpass $50 billion by 2028.

At the time of its release, British Columbia Health Minister Adrian Dix described the panel’s interim report as encouraging, but said the federal government would need to “step up.”

“It’s very positive to see the interim report, but ultimately this issue will be about whether the federal government is prepared to cost-share or not,” he said.

Hoskins’ advisory council is set to issue a final report on the issue of access to drug coverage this spring, with the findings to be tabled in the House of Commons.

Kristy Kirkup, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Aftershock soccer tournament takes over Port Hardy fields

Around the clock matches were played in divisions ranging from tots to U18.

Eke Me-Xi Learning Centre’s 2018-2019 graduating class

The Eke Me-Xi Learning Centre is located on the Tsulquate reserve in the North Island.

Skin deep: A look inside the ink behind Beacon Tattoo

Patrick Berube, owner of Beacon Tattoo, spends most of his Tuesdays at… Continue reading

Second recreational cannabis shop opens its doors in Port Hardy

Pacificanna owner Darren Saunders was excited to finally see his family-run business open up shop.

Bradshaw’s Photo Highlight: A lone crow landing beside an eagle

“I saw an eagle just sitting there, but I had a feeling it wouldn’t be there long as I got closer”

VIDEO: Driver doing laps in busy Vancouver intersections nets charges

Toyota Camry spotted doing laps in intersection, driving towards pedestrians

B.C. Ferries vessel breaks down right before long weekend

Horseshoe Bay-Langdale route impacted most, revised schedule adds 4 a.m. sailings

Every situation is different, jurors hear at coroners inquest into Oak Bay teen’s overdose death

Pediatrician says involuntary treatment necessary following overdose, opioid use

Nanaimo man gets jail time for posting explicit photos of ex-girlfriends

Man’s name cannot be revealed to protect victims’ identities

North Island thrift store robbed at knifepoint, say RCMP

Suspect fled on bicycle following Tuesday stick-up

RCMP across Canada to soon unionize, according to B.C. mayor

A spokeswoman for RCMP headquarters in Ottawa says it’s not yet a done deal

Explicit sex-ed guide for adults mistakenly given to Creston elementary students

The booklet clearly states online and inside that the guide contains sexually explicit information

Driver has $240K McLaren impounded minutes after buying it in West Vancouver

Officers clocked the car travelling at 160 km/h along Highway 1 in a 90 km/h zone

Most Read