Council keeps an eye on BC Ferries appeal

Port Hardy add support to a resolution asking for Federal protection for municipalities.

PORT HARDY—Delta Council sent a letter to the Mayor and Council last week informing them of a resolution to ask that the Province provide protection for municipalities against any loss of revenue from the Property Assessment Appeal Board ruling with respect to the BC Ferry Service.

The Horseshoe Bay Ferry Terminal had its value recently reassessed, slashing its assessed value from $47 million to just $20. BC Ferries successfully argued that, since the property only usable as a ferry terminal, the property was worthless.

The decision, currently under appeal from the District of West Vancouver, would cost the municipality hundreds of thousands of dollars in lost property taxes and the decision, if upheld, could be applied at other ferry terminals.

“I think it was something like $2 million Delta had to swallow on that,” said Mayor Parnham. “It’s something we want to keep a close eye on; we’re in a somewhat similar position.”

Originally presented for information, Council voted to add its support to the resolution.

 

 

 

Tsunami pamphlet

Mayor Parnham announced that the planned Tsunami Preparedness pamphlet will be out “really soon.”

The Mayor confirmed the fire department would assist in delivering the pamphlet, going door-to-door in the coming weeks.

She thanked Jeff Long for his work on the project, and was happy with the progress made in response to the 7.9 earthquake off Haida Gwaii in late October and the resulting tsunami alert and local evacuation.

“We’ve come a long way in the six or so weeks since it happened,” Parnham said.

 

 

 

Computer use

Director of Corporate and Development Services Jeff Long brought back an amended Computer Use Policy to the Council for approval.

“The report was presented at the last meeting; the current policy has a narrow focus and this is an attempt to provide a more current policy,” he explained.

Some of the language in the previous attempt to update the policy was questioned, and returned to staff for clarification. “There was some conflict last time over some of the terms so we’ve had another kick of the cat,” said Long.

Mayor Parnham thanked him for his efforts, saying the new draft “looks good.” The new policy was approved.

 

Shoreline

Economic Development and Community Coordinator Patti Smedley put forward an item recommending that the District reregister as a Municipal Partner for the coming year’s Pitch-in Week.

Pitch-in Week is a community clean-up initiative, where millions of Canadian volunteers take time out to get involved in recycling and local beautification programs.

 

The motion was approved, with the Mayor adding that it was “really well done last year, they really did a good job.”

 

 

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