Estuary preservation a good sign

PORT HARDY — Government, Ducks Unlimited unveil wildlife interpretive sign to mark Quatse Estuary Wildlife Management area

Representatives from government and non-government organizations unveiled a new wildlife interpretation sign at the Quatse Estuary Wildlife Management Area Friday.

The 157-hectare area, just south and east of Port Hardy, was established in April of 2013 by the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations.

“Whenever we can protect a critical piece of critical habitat for future generations it is always a good news story,” said Brad Amer, manager of provincial operations for Ducks Unlimited Canada.

Only three per cent of the Vancouver Island landscape is estuary, said Ron Diederichs, section head for ecosystems with the Ministry of Forest, Lands, and Natural Resource Operations.

“While we are a resource-based community, we are also keenly aware of our responsibility to protect the environment and conserve irreplaceable wildlife habitat like the Quatse River Estuary,” said District of Port Hardy Mayor Hank Bood.

“So to the folks at Ducks Unlimited and its partners, I would like to thank you for the amazing work you’ve done in creating the Quatse Estuary Wildlife Management Area and reiterate once again that in Port Hardy you have a partner and a steadfast supporter,” Bood said.

The wildlife management area is made up of the Glen Lyon, Quatse and Quatsese River estuaries. It consists of estuarine/tidal marsh habitat, riparian river corridors and floodplain. All seven Pacific salmon species depend on the Quatse River Estuary at some point in their life cycle. The estuary, an area where rivers meet the sea, is also part of the Pacific Flyway corridor and provides critical wintering habitat for over 60 species of waterfowl and other waterbirds.  Year round, the estuary and adjacent highlands provide habitat to over 100 bird species. Common bird and waterfowl species include Northern Shovellers, Green-winged Teal, Gadwall, American Widgeon, Harlequin Duck, Trumpeter Swans, Hooded Mergansers, Bald Eagles and Great Blue Herons.

As they migrate, birds “need to fuel up,” said Ducks Unlimited Head of Conservation – BC Coast, and biologist Dan Buffett. “We need these little fuel stations all along the BC coast,” Buffett said.

Several partners assist the province with the background work required to recommend sites for designation including Ducks Unlimited Canada, The Nature Trust of BC, the Nature Conservancy of Canada, and the Canadian Wildlife Service of Environment Canada. The Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation also contributes funding to help with designations and for day-to-day management of the sites after they are designated.

Going forward, the BC ministry will manage the area through a partnership of organizations called the Vancouver Island Land Management Program, which consists of the Province of British Columbia, Environment Canada, Ducks Unlimited, The Nature Trust of British Columbia and Nature Conservancy Canada. Along with funding from the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation, these partners secure and conserve wetlands and other habitats on Vancouver Island.

There are walking trails and viewing platforms within the Quatse River Wildlife Management Area.

Just Posted

North Island College holding information session on new culinary diploma

Get a sneak peek at the new culinary kitchen at the Campbell River campus

Council approves replacement of overhead heaters at Fire Hall

Port Hardy council has agreed to spend $11,000 on the replacement of… Continue reading

North Island Eagles minor rep ockey organization hand out year-end awards in Port McNeill

It was quite the season and then some for minor rep hockey here in the North Island.

North Island resident to campaign on climate, economy for Liberal Party seat in Ottawa

Peter Schwarzhoff joins race for the second time in North Island-Powell River riding

Press release: Port Alice Health Centre service model announced

“a sustainable and dependable model of health care service delivery in Port Alice is a priority”

Kelowna toddler suffers cracked skull after fall from balcony

Neighbour who found the two-year-old boy said he has a bump the size of a golf ball on his head

Crews fight fire with fire to keep blaze from northern Alberta town

The wildfire now covers some 920 square kilometres

Man in B.C. charged with murder and arson in 2016 New Brunswick death

He is charged in the death of 71-year-old Lucille Maltais, who was found inside a burned down home

Improve your life and theirs, adopt a cat from the BC SPCA

The BC SPCA holds an adult cat adoption promotion

Support growing for orphaned Okanagan child after father dies in highway crash

Family thanks emergency crews for assistance in traumatic incident

RCMP probe if teen was intentionally hit with ski pole by mystery skier on B.C. mountain

The incident happened on March 20 on Grouse Mountain. Police are urging witnesses to come forward

Pipeline protester chimes in on Justin Trudeau’s B.C. fundraising speech

The government purchased the Trans Mountain pipeline and expansion project for $4.5 billion

Baby boom seniors putting pressure on B.C. long-term care: report

B.C. leads Canada in growth of dementia, dependence on care

Most Read