Ex-employee describes alleged sexual assault by B.C. city councillor

Complainant was a teen during the alleged 1992 incident

A former employee of a B.C. city councillor testified at the start of his trial Monday that he sexually assaulted her at their workplace in 1992.

The woman, whose identity is covered by a publication ban, told the court she began working for Pitt Meadows city councillor David Murray that summer and that the two initially had a friendly relationship.

“I liked being around him,” she said. “He treated me really nicely, said nice things to me.”

READ MORE: Pitt Meadows councillor charged with sex assault

His behaviour eventually turned “inappropriate” as he bought her expensive clothing and took her out for dinners, including one at a revolving restaurant.

“I remember he bought me really expensive jeans… that I really liked but couldn’t afford,” she said, adding that her mother and stepfather, with whom she lived at the time, were “concerned” about the relationship.

“I knew he liked me, he was flirtatious with me,” the complainant said. “But I liked it and I didn’t want it to stop.”

One day in late summer or early fall of 1992, Murray asked her to come into work early.

When she arrived, she said the workplace was still closed and Murray was the only person there.

The complainant broke down in the courtroom, her voice shaky and her eyes teary as she described the alleged assault.

She said she was lying down, and that Murray was kneeling beside her as moved his hands up her leg, under her shorts, and touched her genitals.

“It was awkward… he seemed nervous,” she said. “I turned my head and closed my eyes and waited for it to stop.”

The complainant said she recalled lying on the ground, frozen.

“I was feeling like it was my fault and that I got myself into shady situations,” she said. “I knew the attention he was giving me [leading up to the alleged assault] was inappropriate but I allowed it to continue.”

The complainant could not remember how long the alleged assault lasted, but said that when it was done, Murray walked away to a different part of the workplace.

“I waited to be sure he wasn’t there and then I stood up and went about my day,” she said. “We acted like it was a normal workday.”

She finished her shift and never came back to work. She did not see Murray again until she moved to Pitt Meadows as an adult.

‘It felt like a punch in the stomach’

She recalled visiting the city’s website one day and seeing that Murray was a city councillor.

“I then Googled his name, saw his face and it felt like a punch in the stomach,” she said. “I was upset that I had bought a home and a business in a city where a man who had molested me was in government.”

The complainant’s voice shook as she described seeing Murray’s name everywhere, especially as a campaign for the 2014 local elections began.

There were signs with his name and face all across Pitt Meadows, she recalled. She told the court she even switched gyms to get away from seeing him.

She decided to report Murray to the RCMP in 2015, following a public city meeting where she saw him in person.

“I was upset and angry that everywhere I went, I risked running into him and be reminded of what he did,” she said. “I felt like I couldn’t be a part of the community… I felt like I had a secret to be ashamed of.”

Defence centres on timeline

Murray, first elected to Pitt Meadows council in 2011, was originally charged with sexual assault and sexual interference of a person under the age of 14. But Crown counsel asked for the second charge to be stayed, citing an inability to confirm whether the complainant was 13 or 14 at the time of the alleged assault.

During cross-examination, defence lawyer J. R. McRoberts focused on the inexact date of the alleged assault, as well as on the complainant’s drug use as a teenager.

She and Crown had established a timeline where the complainant had quit school in 1991, returning in the fall 1992.

McRoberts asked the complainant if her drug use was why she had left school. The complainant denied that this was the only reason, but acknowledged that it was a contributing factor.

He further questioned her on what drugs she had taken, asking specifically about LSD.

The complainant denied using LSD, but did say that she was using marijuana, pills and alcohol daily.

The alcohol and what McRoberts termed “wakeup pills” were stolen from her stepfather, she said.

McGregor questioned the complainant’s recollection of the dinners between her and Murray and asked if she recalled a specific dinner with Murray, a coworker and several RCMP officers. She did not.

He quizzed her about what year she worked for Murray. The complainant had specified the “warmer weather months” of 1992 during her earlier testimony. McGregor suggested she had worked there a year later.

The complainant said she was pretty sure about her timeline, but that she could be wrong.

The trial is expected to last through Wednesday at provincial court in Port Coquitlam.

Comments are closed

Just Posted

UPDATE: Police determine no emergency in Friday’s mystery radio appeal for help

Police had asked for help following mysterious signals from somewhere between Comox and Sayward

Port Hardy RCMP request assistance in tracking down shoplifter

The RCMP are requesting the public’s assistance identifying the female.

More sailings coming to 10 BC Ferries’ routes

Transportation Minister Claire Trevena said the sailings were originally cut in 2014

Grieg Seafood awarded for employee wellness initiatives at BC Agri-Food Industry Gala

Grieg Seafood BC’s employee wellness initiatives were recognized at the BC Agri-Food… Continue reading

District of Port Hardy accepts $295,750 bid to replace Don Cruickshank Memorial Arena’s chiller

Council accepted a $295,750 bid by a refrigeration contractor to replace the arena’s chiller.

VIDEO: Iconic ‘snow cone’ takes shape at B.C. park near Clearwater

Snow cone forming at Wells Gray Provincial Park one that would make Disney’s Queen Elsa proud

Pink Shirt Day a reminder to ‘T.H.I.N.K.’ before posting on social media

‘Be Kind’ message on shirts sold for anti-bullying activities of Wednesday, Feb. 27

A ‘warm embrace’ for grieving parents at funeral of seven young fire victims

Mourners offered love and support to Kawthar Barho, mother of seven children

Indigenous leaders, politicians say Trans Mountain report flawed

The National Energy Board has endorsed an expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline a second time

B.C. man creates Indigenous colouring book for children

Leon McFadden is working on 11 more books to finish the horoscope series

UPDATE: Reports of rashes prompt closure of all Harrison Hot Springs pools

Public pool available after Fraser Health shut down all five mineral pools until further notice

Legislation to protect B.C. farmland comes into effect

Regulations enhance food security, encourage long-term farming

Have you heard the legend of Shuswaggi, the Shuswap Lake monster?

Witness accounts as old as 1904, and as recent as 2018, place a creature in the lake’s depths

Credit card fraud steals $50,000 from Victoria businesses: police

Crime Reduction Unit investigating several frauds costing several businesses over $50,000

Most Read