Fireworks fund gets a boost

Port Hardy council have guaranteed funds to ensure Filomi fun.

PORT HARDY—Council agreed to boost its Filomi Days contribution to ensure the event goes off with a bang.

Council agreed to dip into contingency funding to guarantee enough money would be available for the fireworks spectacular planned to round off the Filomi Days celebration.

The Filomi Days Committee had previously asked for a grant of $10,000 to cover the cost of the celebrations, in particular the costly but spectacular fireworks display that is always a highlight of the weekend.

The Council had agreed to a donation of $6,000 at its last meeting and had resolved to look at other sources of funding from the budget in time for this week to make up the difference.

After reviewing the options presented by the Director of Financial Services, Deb Clipperton, the Council reached a funding compromise that guarantees the celebration will go ahead as planned.

A further $2,000 will be added to the Council’s donations, with the funds taken from the grant in aid budget. The Filomi Days Committee will seek sponsorship and donations for the remaining $2,000, with Council holding money from the contingency fund as a guarantee in the event of the committee being unable to raise the funds.

“It’s our annual celebration,” Councilor John Tidbury pointed out, after noting that funds also covered things like kids’ activities, insurance and advertising. “People come back here for it, they build grad reunions around it.”

Mayor Bev Parnham agreed, saying it was good for the economy. “It brings a lot of people into the community and it’s up to us to support it.”

Also discussed at the meeting was the controversial Bill C-38 currently being pushed by the federal government.

The legislation is a budget implementation bill which includes a raft of changes to everything from immigration to food safety. One of the most controversial sections, and the one discussed at council, is the proposed change to the Fisheries Act.

Proponents argue the change is needed to cut bureaucracy from an excessively expansive law, while opponents say the changes will, in effect, gut environmental protection and remove measures in place to protect waterways.

Letters have been sent from several municipalities asking Council to adopt a resolution urging the government to abandon the proposed changes, and at least one stating support for a change.

Since the issue is so controversial, Council resolved to ask representatives from Pacificus and the Department of Fisheries and Oceans to come before Council and discuss the implications of the proposed changes before adopting a firm position on the issue.

Council also looked forward to the arrival of the delegation from Numata, Japan, after receiving a letter from Yoshinori Kaneihira, the Mayor of Port Hardy’s twin town.

They discussed some of the events that were planned for Port Hardy’s guests and agreed that the delegation had a fun-filled week ahead of them.

The Council commended the work done by the Twinning Society and Mayor Parnham invited all the Councilors to attend the July 18 welcome breakfast arranged for the delegates.

The Council also discussed its delegation to the Union of British Columbia Municipalities convention to be held in Victoria this September.

The annual conventions allow representatives from B.C. municipalities to come together and discuss issues and experiences in their constituencies. It also gives a forum for local-level government representatives to meet with Ministers and discuss their concerns.

Councillors Marcotte and Tidbury expressed interest in joining the Mayor at the event, while Councillor Huddlestan said he would already be in attendance on behalf of the Regional District of Mount Waddington.

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