Ling cod.

Judge orders fine for Fisheries Act violations, bulk of it will go towards conservation, education

$28,500 will benefit projects in Haida Gwaii and Vancouver Island’s west coast

A judge-ordered fine for Fisheries Act violations will pump $28,500 into fisheries conservation, education and stewardship in Haida Gwaii and Vancouver Island.

In November 2018, in Port Hardy Provincial Court, Judge Brian Hutcheson found fishing vessel master Ricky Sadler guilty of two violations of the Fisheries Act dating back to 2015 and 2016.

Justice Hutcheson ordered Sadler to pay a total fine of $30,000 with $19,000 going toward fisheries conservation, education and stewardship in the Haida Gwaii area, and $9,500 for similar West Coast Vancouver Island projects.

According to a news release from Fisheries and Oceans Canada, the sentence relates to: failing to provide assistance to a dock-side observer in Port Hardy by dumping Lingcod overboard prior to validation; setting gear and fishing in the closed Estevan Point Rockfish Conservation area and additionally failing to submit log books seven days after landing.

The Government of Canada is committed to safeguarding the long-term health and productivity of Canada’s fisheries resources, and the habitat that supports them, for generations to come, the release says. Fisheries and Oceans Canada has a mandate to protect and conserve marine resources and to prosecute offenders under the Fisheries Act. It ensures and promotes compliance with the act and other laws and regulations through a combination of land, air, and sea patrols, as well as education and awareness activities.

As part of Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s work to end illegal activity, the department asks the public for information on activities of this nature or any contravention of the Fisheries Act and regulations. Anyone with information can call the toll-free violation reporting line at 1-800-465-4336.

Quick Facts:

• Electronic monitoring of commercial vessels via cameras, gear sensors, and a Global Positioning System is in place to ensure compliance with conditions of licence and regulations governing the groundfish fishery.

• One of the conditions of allowing electronic monitoring is that fishers must retain all rockfish catch on board the vessel and the entire catch must be validated upon docking by the designated dockside observer. Fishers are individually accountable for all of their catch.

• Accurate, timely and independently-verified catch information supports effective fisheries management and the long-term sustainability of the groundfish resource, encourages responsible fishing practices, and supports Canada’s international obligations.

• Many species of B.C.’s rockfish are at historically low levels of abundance. Sedentary, with slow growth rates, rockfish can live to well over 100 years and many will not reproduce until aged 10 to 15 years. As a conservation measure, Fisheries and Oceans Canada has established 164 Rockfish Conservation Areas along the B.C. coast where fishing for rockfish is prohibited.

RELATED: Crab poaching under cover of darkness earns 10-year commercial fishing ban, vessel seizure

RELATED: Port Hardy man fined $5,000 for fishing in a Rockfish Conservation Area in 2012


@AlstrT
editor@campbellrivermirror.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Skin deep: A look inside the ink behind Beacon Tattoo

Patrick Berube, owner of Beacon Tattoo, spends most of his Tuesdays at… Continue reading

Second recreational cannabis shop opens its doors in Port Hardy

Pacificanna owner Darren Saunders was excited to finally see his family-run business open up shop.

Bradshaw’s Photo Highlight: A lone crow landing beside an eagle

“I saw an eagle just sitting there, but I had a feeling it wouldn’t be there long as I got closer”

Port McNeill council’s June 17 meeting features ‘packed agenda’

A draft policy on wildfire response for the Port McNeill Volunteer Fire Department was presented.

Services at the Port Alice Health Centre get clarification from Island Health…. sort of

“In our initial talks it was imperative that the emergency room and all the equipment could stay”

Air Canada reviewing how crew left sleeping passenger on parked plane

In a Facebook post, the woman said she woke up ‘all alone’ on a ‘cold dark’ aircraft

Heroism medal for B.C. woman who tried to save wheelchair-bound man stuck on rail tracks

Julie Callaghan awarded Carnegie Medal from U.S.-based foundation for ‘extraordinary heroism’

Surrey RCMP raises Pride flag Monday amid din of protesters

There were about 30 protesters on either side, and 20 Mounties doing crowd control

Thieves steal tents from B.C. school, Grade 7 camping trip happens anyway

Nanaimo businesses, school staff and parents ensure trip goes on

Only legal pot shop between Vancouver and Kamloops now open

Private cannabis store on Skwah land in Chilliwack is first B.C. licensee to be Indigenous owned

Green Party candidate talks upcoming federal election during visit to the North Island

Mark de Bruijn sat down with the North Island Gazette for an interview on Sunday in Port Hardy.

Canadian communities responding to climate change

New research highlights state of local adaptation planning in Canada

Victoria woman in L.A. hospital after she was run over twice

Lynn Phillips has suffered from multiple broken bones and internal bleeding

‘Text neck’ causing bone spurs to grow from millennials’ skulls, researchers say

Technology use from early childhood causing abnormal bone growths in 41 per cent of young adults

Most Read