Langford’s Kimberly Proctor was the victim of a brutal assault and murder in 2010. (Facebook/Kimberly’s Law)

Man who tortured and killed Vancouver Island teen in 2010 denied full parole

Kruse Wellwood was also denied temporary escorted absences

*Warning: This story contains graphic details about a murder.

One of the two men responsible for the brutal sexual assault, torture and murder of Langford teen Kimberly Proctor has been denied parole, less than one year after being denied day parole.

On Friday, May 15, Kruse Wellwood faced a parole hearing where he also requested escorted temporary absences but both were denied according to Proctor’s aunt, Jo-Anne Landolt.

According to Landolt, Wellwood asked for escorted absences to attend church on Sundays and be part of the faith community.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Proctor’s family members tuned in to the hearing by phone. It took place at Mission Institution, a medium-security prison where Wellwood is an inmate. Landolt said the family read victim impact statements or submitted them by video. She said the Parole Board of Canada deliberated for about 10 minutes before making the decision to deny his full parole.

“He’s still high risk for many things,” Landolt said. “They said he’s still showing signs of aggression and he was punching walls and himself.”

READ ALSO: Man who killed Langford teen attended her memorial service, demonstrates little remorse

In August, the board denied Wellwood’s request for day parole saying they still had concerns. A document regarding the past decision said he did not show any true sense of remorse or accountability, something Landolt said she feels hasn’t changed.

“He’s the same person he was 10 years ago, he’s just locked up,” Landolt said.

In March 2010, then 16-year-old Wellwood and 17-year-old Cameron Moffat bound, sexually assaulted, choked, gagged and placed Proctor in a freezer. The next day, they put her body in a duffel bag and took it to an area near the Galloping Goose to burn it. They were handed adult sentences of life in prison with no chance of parole for 10 years for the premeditated rape and murder of 18-year-old Proctor.

Moffat waived his day parole hearing last year and waived his full parole hearing as well, according to Landolt.

In 2011, a psychologist said Wellwood met the criteria for clinical psychopathy and sexual sadism and would require close supervision over the next 30 years or more. In July, a psychologist reiterated the previous assessment and did not support releasing Wellwood.

READ ALSO: Proctor’s killers troubled, angry from the start

The family and media were unable to attend the parole hearing due to COVID-19 restrictions and media were not given an option to call in. Landolt said the family expressed discontent with that decision, as now they have the added burden to reaching out to media to let the public know what the outcome was.

Landolt said Wellwood can apply for temporary absences again and will be able to apply for day parole in August. The next full parole hearing is still a few years away, but Landolt said she doesn’t think anything will change.

“Even if he said he had remorse it would be a lie,” Landolt said. “It’s stupid to even have these hearings because I don’t think there will ever be a point that he could be released.”

shalu.mehta@blackpress.ca


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

City of Langfordmurder

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

North Island Elementary students published in short story collection

Five Fort Rupert Elementary students are now bonafide authors

MP asks Minister of Transport for review of safe crew levels on new ferries

The new ferries were approved to run with smaller crew sizes, raising safety concerns

$8,179,919 in grant funding announced for North Island communities

This local funding is part of over $228 million in grants going to B.C. communities.

Port Hardy earns Bear Smart certification

Community committed to living safely alongside bears

Funding police would be ‘most expensive single budget item we would have’ says Port Hardy councillor

‘we’re not panicking — I can’t see our population numbers jumping up that high that quick’

VIDEO: Musqueam Chief captures captivating footage of bald eagle catching meal

‘This is why we have chosen to live here since time immemorial,’ Chief Wayne Sparrow’s nephew says

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Stop enforcing sex work laws during COVID-19, advocates say

There are provisions in Canada’s prostitution laws that make workers immune from prosecution, but not from arrest

Liberal party finished 2019 having spent $43 million, raised $42 million

All political parties had until midnight June 30 to submit their financial reports for last year

B.C. teacher loses licence after sexual relationships with two recently-graduated students

The teacher won’t be allowed to apply for a teaching certificate until 2035

Most Read