Mounties get their man – twice

Port Hardy RCMP arrested the same individual within three days.

It was a scenario right out of a television police drama. Port Hardy RCMP were called to a residential break and enter on Oct. 24 at 9:54 p.m.

According to a witness, the culprit was seen on the fourth floor balcony of the Highland Manor Apartments attempting to break into an unoccupied unit.

The witness scared the culprit, who proceeded to scale down the outside of the building “using balconies as stepping stones,” said Staff Sgt. Wes Olsen.

The witness gave chase and then lost sight of the culprit. The suspect subsequently returned to the scene of the crime, scaling up to the fourth floor again.

RCMP officers were inside the apartment and when the suspect saw them, he scaled back down and started running.

The police officer went down “the conventional way” and chased the suspect on foot to Granville Street where he caught up with him at the Town Park Apartments in what Olsen described as “an impressive feat” – given that Mounties carry approximately 25 pounds in gear.

A 21-year-old man was arrested and charged with break and enter and obstructing a police officer after he refused to stop.

The man was held in cells overnight for an appearance in court Oct. 25 and was subsequently released by the judge pending a further court appearance Nov. 29. On Oct. 27 at 1:30 a.m. Port Hardy RCMP were dispatched to a complaint of a man wielding a knife at the Town Park Apartments.

Members attended and discovered that a 46-year-old man had been stabbed in the stomach after an argument in the stairwell between the first and second floors, Olsen said.

Police arrested a 21-year-old Port Hardy resident who was the same accused in the break and enter two nights earlier.

The suspect is currently in custody and has been charged with aggravated assault, uttering threats and possession of a weapon.

Emergency Services personnel transported the victim to the Port Hardy Hospital and he was later transported to the Campbell River Hospital for further treatment.

 

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