TYSON WHITNEY PHOTO                                Emily Barrett discusses her social justice project with one of the judges.

TYSON WHITNEY PHOTO Emily Barrett discusses her social justice project with one of the judges.

North Island Secondary School’s Social Justice Expo 2018

“It’s like a science fair, but with social justice issues.”

What is North Island Secondary School’s (NISS) Social Justice Expo?

According to NISS teacher Nimfa Casson, the Social Justice Expo, which was held on Jan. 18 in the school’s multi-purpose room, is her grade 11/12 classes final project for the semester. “It’s like a science fair, but with social justice issues,” she said. “They have to choose a topic, and they have to have an inquiry question — it’s an inquiry based approach. They choose a subject like human trafficking, but they have a specific question about human trafficking they have to research, and then they put their display together.”

The projects are then reviewed by judges “with a criteria, and the students are asked questions and evaluated,” said Casson.

NISS Social Justice Expo is an annual event that showcases students’ breadth and depth of research on social issues that matter to them. The activity is set out to develop in students a keen awareness of social justice issues, its causes, and gives them the tools necessary to successfully participate in finding probable solutions through local or global service-learning projects.

Casson added that “One of the big goals of the project is to create awareness, and I hope they can make a difference and effect change later on.”

Grade 11 student Kachina Boyer-Oyler did her project on how different types of alternative energies (power sources) can improve third world countries. “I have three different types of power that could improve third world countries, and the country I’m using as an example is Ethiopia,” she said, adding she chose the subject because she is “just really into environmental stuff, and I really like the idea of solar power — It’s really expensive, but once you get it, it’s there indefinitely.”

Some other social justice issues students could have chosen to do their projects on were:

Immigration, teen pregnancy, environment, gun violence, tolerance, discrimination, fair trade, basic human rights, human trafficking, housing, diversity, media and advertising, civil and political rights, social and economic rights, GMO’s, child exploitation, education, globalization, sweatshops, racism, genocide, gender issues, women’s rights, prostitution, etc.

NISS Principal Jay Dixon said he was proud of the students projects and could tell they had spent a lot of time working on them.

“The students did an excellent job with their presentations. It is a prime example of how connected and knowledgeable youth are about today’s issues.”

 

TYSON WHITNEY PHOTO                                Kachina Boyer-Oyler shows off her alternative energy sources social justic project.

TYSON WHITNEY PHOTO Kachina Boyer-Oyler shows off her alternative energy sources social justic project.