Janet Dorward

Port Hardy: Janet Dorward

While we seem to have more water than we want at times in Port Hardy, the clear and very drinkable water coming from our taps today

  • Nov. 10, 2011 5:00 a.m.

1. Do you support the installation of water meters and if yes, who should pay for them?

2. Because Port Hardy has experienced a marked decline in population in recent years should we cut the number of councillors from six to four and why or why not?

3. More than 50 per cent of Port Hardy pool users are from outside the district yet we fund the entire operation. How can we recoup some of the costs?

4. Why should people vote for you?

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1. While we seem to have more water than we want at times in Port Hardy, the clear and very drinkable water coming from our taps today (thank you EPCOR) has been treated and of course, that costs money and we should all be mindful of unnecessary use and leaks. Education about responsible consumption should be the first option but the costs and benefits of metering versus not metering should be explored.

2. A quick review of similar-sized BC towns shows that many have six councillors. Our town is somewhat uniquely diverse in its facilities, economies, and geography so we need enough councillors to bring information to the table from all sectors to ensure full and fair representation of all stakeholders .I suggest our community is best served with six positions.

3. The costs of operating this important facility are basically the same regardless of where our pool users come from. We can improve the health and fitness of North Islanders while increasing income by encouraging more use of it by everyone.

4. My Port Hardy roots run deeper than the carrot in the park where I was born. I’ve worked, lived, played and raised my children here. I’ve witnessed our town on economic upswing and on the downturn. I am passionate about Port Hardy and have plenty of energy to use my experience and management skills to serve our town and maximize the opportunities available to our community.

 

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