The Canadian Orca Rescue Society said the organization brings the inflatable orcas to many local events. They want to empower young people to fight for the planet and support indigenous peoples in their efforts to protect the environment. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

Protesters rally in Victoria over newly approved Trans Mountain pipeline

The Still No Consent! No Trans Mountain! 20 kilometre march will end at Island View Beach

Trans Mountain pipeline protesters kicked off a march on Saturday Morning in downtown Victoria.

READ MORE: Just over 50% of British Columbians agree with Trans Mountain project approval

Organized by a group called Rise and Resist, the Still No Consent! No Trans Mountain! 20 kilometre march began in Centennial Square. The protesters began to gather at 8 a.m. while marshalls met to prepare for the day.

The march will include a 7 kilometre stretch of highway as the group makes their way to the end of their route at Island View Beach in Tsawout First Nation territory at 5 p.m.

A blessing, speeches, songs and drumming all helped get the protesters of all ages in the mood to march. Many were planning on walking the entire route, but others brought their bikes.

READ ALSO: Pipeline protesters plan march as Trudeau gives Trans Mountain the go-ahead

“We will walk-upy [sic] seven kilometres of Highway 17 to send a direct message to Trudeau that there is resistance from coast to coast in so-called Canada,” an announcer said to the cheering group.

Another speaker encouraged the protesters to raise their fists high in the air.

“When you come together, you become unstoppable. It’s beautiful to see you all here today as one human family, building a bridge for the children. The children are doing it themselves too,” they said, referencing the work of young activists such as Greta Thunberg from Sweden.

READ ALSO: Trans Mountain pipeline protesters rally in Vancouver

The speaker compares the pipeline’s harm to the earth with injecting one’s mother with bitumen and then trying to cure her with medicinal herbs. They spoke of the importance of listening to the knowledge of Indigenous matriarchs. They then invited one of the matriarchs in attendance to speak.

“The little babies will suffer if we don’t do something,” she said. “I get really emotional. The earth is part of me and I am part of the earth…. It’s time for us to walk together and love this earth.”

Gregg McElroy from the Canadian Orca Rescue Society was one of the people carrying an inflatable orca. The organization brings the inflatables to many local events, he explained.

“Let’s work together,” said McElroy. “One voice can’t be heard in the wilderness, but a million voices can be heard across this nation.”

The march will end with a free community feast at Island View Beach at 6 p.m.


@devonscarlett
devon.bidal@saanichnews.com

Like us on Facebook and
follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

UVic students showing off their sign. They heard about the march through friends and were encouraged by the Facebook group that showed over 1,000 people were interested in attending. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

A speaker encouraged protestors to raise their fists. “When you come together, you become unstoppable. It’s beautiful to see you all here today as one human family.” (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

The tiny house will follow the protestors today with the help of a truck and will the continue to the Secwempec territory to be used by protestors along the proposed pipeline route. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

The inflatable orcas getting ready for the march courtesy of the Canadian Orca Rescue Society. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

Some protestors brought their bikes to the march. (Devon Bidal/News Staff)

Just Posted

Creekside Apartments gets utility charge relief from Port Hardy council

The apartment building is undergoing restoration from a fire that happened back in 2017.

LETTER: It’s a labour of love keeping the Port Alice golf course running

‘We North Islanders are indeed fortunate to have two gorgeous golf club’

Mowi’s B.C. salmon farms achieve environmental certification from independent watchdog

Aquaculture Steward Council certification complies with 500 sustainability and social measures

Island Health provides Baby Beds for infants north of the Malahat

A safe place for baby to sleep is key to reduce sleep-related deaths

Author chronicles churches built by pioneers in the Salish Sea

B.C. author Liz Bryan preserving a little bit of pioneer history in her latest book

B.C. sees 25 new COVID-19 cases, community exposure tracked

One death, outbreaks remain in two long-term care facilities

VIDEO: Vancouver Island cat missing 18 months reunited with family

Blue the cat found at Victoria museum 17 kilometres from home

VIDEO: Alberta man rescues baby eagle believed to be drowning in East Kootenay lake

Brett Bacon was boating on a lake in Windermere when he spotted the baby eagle struggling in the water

Vancouver Island business ad unintentionally features OK gesture linked to white supremacy

Innocuous ‘OK’ gesture in cleaning franchise advertisement gets flak on social media for ‘supposedly’ promoting white supremacy

Minivan driver’s speed a factor in fatal 2018 Malahat crash

Driver was travelling at 110 km/h in a construction zone

Comox Valley RCMP looking for missing woman

Ami Guthrie was last seen in Courtenay in early July

Conservationists raise concerns over state of care for grizzly cubs transferred to B.C. zoo

‘Let them be assessed now before their fate is sealed,’ urges B.C. conservationist Barb Murray

B.C.’s COVID-19 job recovery led by tourism, finance minister says

Okanagan a bright spot for in-province visitor economy

National Kitten Day aka the ‘purrfect’ day to foster a new friend

July 10 marks National Kitten Day, a special day to celebrate all things kittens

Most Read