Sharon Noble

Smart meter class action suit fails

Effect from thousands of wireless meters impossible to assess against other radio frequency emission sources

The B.C. Supreme Court has dismissed an application by anti-smart meter activists to certify a class action suit against BC Hydro’s use of the wireless meters.

It’s the latest defeat for opponents of wireless meters, whose claims of health hazards have also been rejected by the B.C. Utilities Commission and the B.C. Human Rights Tribunal.

In her June 12 decision, Justice Elaine Adair agreed with BC Hydro expert Dr. Benjamin Cotts that it would be impossible to assess a “common issue” of thousands of customers’ exposure to radio frequency exposure, because of endless variations in distance and wall materials separating people from meters.

Cotts also noted that in addition to radio frequency emissions from radio stations, cell phones, baby monitors, TV and weather radar, natural sources including lightning, other humans and the Earth itself make the assessment of meter emissions impractical.

BC Hydro said in a statement it is pleased by the decision on a wireless electricity system that has “realized $100 million in benefits in the first three years of the program, including reductions in electricity theft.”

The proposed representative plaintiffs in the class action application included Nomi Davis, who operates a yoga and healing centre business in her home, and Sharon Noble, a long-time protester against wireless meters.

Just Posted

B.C. to move salmon farms out of coastal migration route

Broughton Archipelago plan set to start in spring of 2019

New wind warning for most of Vancouver Island

Forecasters are calling for strong winds up to 90km/h for some areas

Mount Washington opening for winter season this weekend

The resort’s original opening day was delayed due to lack of snow

Shoebox Project: Local women in need to enjoy shoebox gifts

This year over 500 gift filled Shoeboxes were delivered in Campbell River and the North Island.

Trapped Vancouver Island crash survivor celebrates second chance at life

“Life is good now. It’s good to be alive.”

Tommy Chong says Canada took wrong approach to pot legalization

He also talked about the likelihood of another Cheech and Chong film

Media, robotics, Indigenous studies coming to B.C. Grade 12 classrooms in 2019-20

Provincial tests are also being changed for students in Grade 10 to 12, the Education Ministry said

VIDEO: Royals reveal the images on their Christmas cards

Prince William and his wife Kate are shown outside in casual clothes, their three young children in tow

ICBC to apply for 6.3% hike to basic insurance rates

Crown Corporation said it will be submitting its next basic rate application to the British Columbia Utilities Commission Friday

Stranded B.C. trucker writes final wishes before being rescued 3 days later

‘I was just praying someone would come along’

Fashion Fridays: How to change your beauty routine

Kim XO, lets you in on her style secrets each Fashion Friday on the Black Press Media Network

‘Both things are true:’ Science, Indigenous wisdom seek common ground

Reconciliation between Canada and First Nations is playing out not only in legislatures and courtrooms but in labs across the country

High winds force several BC Ferries sailing cancellations

Tsawwassen to Swartz Bay, Horseshoe Bay to Departure Bay, and Duke Point to Tsawwassen among closures

Facebook reveals bug gave apps unauthorized access to 6.8 million users’ photos

It’s believed up to 1,500 apps built by 876 developers had access to Facebook Stories, private photos

Most Read