Summer weather conditions near Mount Klitsa in the Alberni Valley. (News Bulletin file photo)

Summer weather conditions near Mount Klitsa in the Alberni Valley. (News Bulletin file photo)

Vancouver Island local governments consult with experts on climate change planning

Community resilience summit happening online Nov. 6

Representatives from Vancouver Island municipalities and First Nations will meet with the experts this week to discuss co-ordinated planning for climate change.

City of Nanaimo councillor Ben Geselbracht is an organizer of a community resilience summit this Friday, Nov. 6, through the Vancouver Island and Coastal Communities’ climate leadership plan steering committee.

According to a press release, close to 150 people are expected to participate in the day-long online summit to plan, as a region, for climate change.

“Local governments have to be properly resourced to deal with climate change,” said Geselbracht. “Through the collective voice of an Island and coastal community plan we can help senior levels of government support us with what we need and effectively collaborate to leverage resources across our communities.”

READ ALSO: City of Nanaimo plans for extreme weather over next 60 years

Duncan Mayor Michelle Staples noted in the release that smaller municipalities like hers don’t have the resources to create comprehensive climate action plans, though residents and businesses are vulnerable to the risks and hazards climate change is presenting.

A central topic of discussion at the summit will be a recent report from University of Victoria researchers that found that “nearly all communities in the VICC region are already experiencing hazards and impacts related to climate change,” and that “urgent mitigation and adaptation efforts are needed.”

The report, Territorial Analysis and Survey of Local Government Priorities for Climate Action: Vancouver Island and Coastal Communities, notes that co-operation between local governments will be critical in “scaling up efforts” and identifies a need for support from senior levels of government.

Some of the climate change effects discussed in the report include wildfires, rain storms, extreme winds, drought and sea level rise.

“By coming together as an Island and coastal communities we have a better chance of meeting the challenges already facing us,” said Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps, VICC-CLP co-chairperson, in the release. “What the UVic research reveals is that rural and urban areas have more common challenges than we have differences. Climate change planning as a whole Island and coastal region makes sense.”

READ ALSO: Nanaimo city council declares climate emergency

READ ALSO: Greater Victoria officials take climate emergency request to regional district

READ ALSO: Cowichan Valley Regional District acknowledges climate emergency

The VICC-CLP’s work has been supported by a grant for the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions at UVic and by faculty members and students.

“This collaboration between UVic researchers and regional community leaders has helped us better understand the unique challenges and opportunities that regional-scale climate planning might offer,” said Kara Shaw, associate professor of environmental studies at UVic, in the release. “We know that the current pace and scale of climate action doesn’t match what is needed; the question is what can a regional-scale approach offer to help bridge this gap?”

She said initial research has indentified “exciting potential areas for action” and added that the resilience summit will provide a forum to build strategies toward taking that action.

VICC-CLP is working with UVic on a 2030 climate leadership plan to be presented at the next Association of Vancouver Island and Coastal Communities convention in April 2021.



editor@nanaimobulletin.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Climate change

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Mackenzie Cox representing the first Black Shirt Day at North Island Secondary. (Zoe Ducklow Photo)
Port McNeill Grade 12 student observes Black Shirt Day for anti-racism

‘Wearing that colour T-shirt for that day is a commitment to show that we care.’

Port McNeill council file photo. (Tyson Whitney - North Island Gazette)
Port McNeill council approves utility fees increase

The fees cover the three major services the town provides; water, solid waste and sewage.

Black Press media file
RCMP catch alleged drunk driver

The driver provided breathalyzer samples in excess of 3.5 times the legal limit.

Health Minister Adrian Dix and provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry head for the press theatre at the B.C. legislature for an update on COVID-19, Jan. 7, 2021. (B.C. government)
B.C.’s COVID-19 spread steady with 509 new cases Friday

Hospitalized and critical care cases decline, nine deaths

Seasonal influenza vaccine is administered starting each fall in B.C. and around the world. (Langley Advance Times)
After 30,000 tests, influenza virually nowhere to be found in B.C.

COVID-19 precautions have eliminated seasonal infection

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau listens to a question during a news conference outside Rideau cottage in Ottawa, Friday, January 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Trudeau says Canada’s COVID vaccine plan on track despite Pfizer cutting back deliveries

Canadian officials say country will still likely receive four million doses by the end of March

Jobs Minister Ravi Kahlon shared a handwritten note his son received on Jan. 13, 2021. (Ravi Kahlon/Twitter)
Proud dad moment: B.C. minister’s son, 10, receives handwritten note for act of kindness

North Delta MLA took to Twitter to share a letter his son received from a new kid at school

Lilly and Poppy, two cats owned by Kalmar Cat Hotel ownder Donna Goodenough, both have cerebellAr hypoplasia, a genetic neurological condition that affects their ability to control their muscles and bones. Photo by Alistair Taylor – Campbell River Mirror
VIDEO: Wobbly Cats a riot of flailing legs and paws but bundles of love and joy to their owner

Woman urges others to not fear adopting cats with disabilities

Dr. Shannon Waters, the medical health officer for the Cowichan Valley Region, is reminding people to stay the course with COVID-19 measures. (File photo)
‘Stay the course’ with COVID measures, Island Health reminds

Limit social activity, wash hands, wear a mask, and isolate if you feel sick

Cowichan Tribes members line up at a drive-up clinic on Wednesday, Jan. 13 to receive the first doses of the COVID-19 vaccine in the region. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
BCAFN condems racism against Cowichan Tribes after COVID-19 outbreak

“Any one of us could do everything right and still catch the virus”: Regional Chief Terry Teegee.

Chief public health officer Dr. Theresa Tam provides an update on the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa on Friday, Jan. 8, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Canada’s top doctor says to avoid non-essential travel as B.C. explores legal options

Premier John Horgan says he is seeking legal advice on whether it can limit interprovincial travel

Nursing staff at West Coast General Hospital celebrate the announcement of a $6.25-million expansion of the emergency department that will start in March 2021. (File photo)
B.C. health ministry commits $6.25M to hospital expansion in Port Alberni

Plans for larger emergency department have been on hold since 2015

Most Read