Victoria legislature dome moving, repair needed

The B.C. legislature's signature copper-clad dome is 'beginning to twist, and that's a problem'.

Seasonal lights were turned on at the B.C. legislature this week

VICTORIA – The B.C. legislature’s signature copper-clad dome is “beginning to twist, and that’s a problem,” MLAs on the legislature management committee were told Thursday.

That’s the most dramatic symptom of deterioration in the 120-year-old structure, whose many structural problems have been put off for decades and could cost up to $70 million to repair.

Legislature clerk Craig James reviewed highlights of an updated engineering report that shows the delicacy of the task.

“The problem with every part of this building is that when you go to fix one part of it, it’s attached to another part, which requires to be fixed as well,” James said. “In fixing, for instance, the dome, it sits on these columns that are supported centrally throughout the rotunda, and we’re advised that if you fix the dome, you should really be looking at and fixing the central portion too.”

The MLA committee is to meet again Dec. 12 to hear from engineers and decide on the next steps. Speaker Linda Reid noted that other legislature renovations have involved moving government operations to another location for as long as 10 years.

The estimate for the most urgent work is $5.7 million, proposed to begin in 2015.

Construction on the limestone structure started in 1893, with additions complete in 1915. It has many plumbing and electrical problems, and does not meet current fire or building codes.

Other buildings on the grounds also have serious problems, including the former armoury behind the legislature whose upper floor has been declared unsafe for use.

 

Just Posted

Blaney warns fraudulent CRA tax calls are on the rise

“We are asking people to please be careful.”

Students ‘wow’ at Annual Regional Science Fair

Kids from accross the North Island show off their science projects

Port Hardy Fire Rescue celebrates 50th anniversary

Port Hardy Fire Rescue (PHFR) is gearing up for a big anniversary… Continue reading

Lack of security: why Vancouver Island food production is on the decline

Big Read: agriculture a big, expensive commitment as advocates push to make us more food secure

Port Alice CAO says goodbye for Sayward

“This decision was by no means an easy one to make.”

Toronto van attack suspect faces 10 counts of first-degree murder

The suspect in the Toronto van attack that killed 10 people and injured 15 others on Monday is a 25-year-old man named Alek Minassian

How to keep local news visible in your Facebook feed

Facebook has changed the news feed to emphasize personal connections. You might see less news.

Doctor sees healing power in psychedelic plant as Peru investigates death of B.C. man

Peru’s attorney general has ordered the arrest of two suspects in the killing of 41-year-old Sebastian Woodroffe

Toronto police officer ‘gave himself the space and time’ in van attack

Footage shows officer standing up, turning off his siren and talking clearly to the suspect

$1.18 to $1.58 a litre: Are you paying the most for gas in B.C.?

Gas prices across B.C. vary, with lowest in Vernon and highest in – you guessed it – Metro Vancouver

Apirl/May Hot Spots!

Find out what’s going on in the North Island (April 25 - May 2)

Inquest set 10 years after B.C. woman shot, left to die

Lisa Dudley, and her partner, Guthrie McKay were shot in their Mission home in September 2008

B.C. hockey team to retire Humboldt Bronco victim’s number

BCHL’s Surrey Eagles to retire Jaxon Joseph’s No. 10 in light of bus tragedy

B.C. Hells Angels invited to rally by anti-SOGI organizer

The Culture Guard group has helped Hells Angels in the past, said its executive director.

Most Read