Wellness Centre planned for Port Hardy

Randy Zonnis returns to the North Island for a two-day instruction clinic of Quantum Touch.

PORT HARDY—Local residents will be offered a chance to learn a personal healing art next weekend when Randy Zonnis arrives for a two-day instruction clinic of Quantum Touch.

But local minister Wade Allen plans for the effects to last much longer.

Allen, the local Anglican/United pastor since June of 2012, hopes to address a community need by establishing a “Wellness Centre”, based on holistic, hands-on care, in available space in the basement of St. Columba Church in Port Hardy beginning in January.

The Quantum Touch clinic, scheduled for Oct. 5-6 at St. Columba, will be the second hosted by Zonnis, a Victoria-based practitioner of the healing art, this year in Port Hardy.

“We had 10 people take the Quantum Touch clinic when Randy was here in the spring,” said Allen. “More will take it next week and, from then until the end of January, it will be practice, practice, practice.

“After January, it will be opened up to the public.”

Allen envisions local residents, trained in the practice, sharing the benefits of Quantum Touch healing with local residents interested in taking advantage of the opportunity.

And that is only the beginning.

“As this is established, we’ll be looking at massage therapy, acupressure, Reiki (a Japanese palm-healing technique),” said Allen, who sees his ministerial call as extending well beyond spreading the word of God as found in the Bible.

He has also been instrumental in helping establish the Wild Heart Music Program for Port McNeill’s children — with hopes to open the program to Port Hardy’s youth in the near future — and has worked with church members to create a “Speakeasy” speaker’s corner series at St. John Gualbert (A-Frame) Church in Port McNeill. Allen, who describes himself as “spiritual, not religious,” more closely resembles an eastern mystic than a Bible-pounding, fire-and-brimstone preacher. These various programs are in keeping with what he describes as the level 1 mantra of Quantum Touch: My intention is pure. God’s love is powerful.

“The first part is about me getting out of the way,” Allen said. “The second part is opening up space for God to come in.”

In other words, the Wellness Centre — like the other church programs — are not about dictating to or haranguing a passive audience. They’re about opening doors to those in need, and letting the visitors determine their need.

“The thing about Quantum Touch is, you’re the healer, not me,” Allen said. “If you ever hear somebody practicing Quantum Touch say they can heal you, run.

“And I’m assuming, rightly or wrongly, that people interested in healing touch are those who care about wellness in the wider view.”

The proposed Wellness Centre at St. Columba will be free to all visitors. Those wishing to benefit from the treatment are strictly self-selected — there are no registration requirements or restrictions on participation. And those who wish to take part as practitioners may pass out business cards and recruit future clients, but they can’t charge a fee during Wellness Centre sessions.

Allen has secured $3,000 for sponsorship from a provisional fund for those who need financial help to take part in next week’s Quantum Touch clinic. In the spring clinic, $1,800 was distributed to offset need, and $1,200 remains to help those who would like to take next weekend’s clinic but who are in financial hardship.

Registration is $360 for the two-day Quantum Touch session. To inquire about the aid or register for the clinic, contact Allen at 250-956-3670.

 

Just Posted

OPINION: Urgent care room will cost lives

“Seniors, of any demographic, are the most vulnerable to the loss of emergency care.”

James Hayward coroner’s inquest rescheduled hours away from where RCMP shooting occured

The family is “a bit disappointed that it’s going to be held in Campbell River”

Deadline looming for North Island College scholarship applications

Students have until April 24 to apply for a record number of… Continue reading

BC Ferries to pilot selling beer and wine on select routes

Drinks from select B.C. breweries and VQA wineries to be sold on Swartz Bay to Tsawwassen route

Gil’s Girls win Harvey Walkus Memorial Ball Hockey Tournament in shootout

This year the tournament was held at the Don Cruickshank Memorial Arena on April 12-14.

VIDEO: Alberta man creates world’s biggest caricature

Dean Foster is trying to break the world record for a radio show contest

Chaos at the ferry terminal for people heading from Vancouver to the Island

Easter crowds create backlog at Tsawwassen ferry terminal

B.C. RCMP receive application for Police Cat Services

RCMP announced the launch of the Police Cat Services unit as an April fools joke

Kirkland Signature veggie burgers recalled due to possible metal fragments

Recalled products came in 1.7 kg packages with a best before date of Apr. 23, 2019

Parents of 13 who tortured children get life after hearing victims

One of their daughters fled their home and pleaded for help to a 911 operator

Flooding, climate change force Quebecers to rethink relationship with water

Compensation for victims of recurring floods limit to 50% of a home’s value, or a maximum of $100,000

Storms blast South, where tornadoes threaten several states

9.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia at a moderate risk of severe weather

Private cargo ship brings Easter feast to the space station

There are three Americans two Russians and one Canadian living on the space station

Notre Dame rector: “Computer glitch” possible fire culprit

The fire burned through the lattice of oak beams supporting the monument’s vaulted stone ceiling

Most Read