Bob Wallas with one of several metal barrels of acetone he found in the bush near Coal Harbour

Year in review: October

Still no clues in case of missing First Nations mom of seven-year-old son

  • Jan. 4, 2012 7:00 p.m.

Family and friends of a missing G’usgimukw woman say they’re frantic to hear from the woman who disappeared from her North Vancouver home in May, in a case still under investigation as a serious crime.

Angeline Eileen Pete is a 28-year-old Quatsino First Nation mom of a seven-year-old son who was last heard from May 21.

The investigation was turned over to the North Vancouver RCMP’s Serious Crime Unit.

• New uses for old materials offered North Island residents and contractors a chance to save money in tipping fees while extending the life of Seven Mile Landfill.

As part of a one-year pilot project, Duroid (asphalt) shingles will be accepted at the landfill for $25 a ton, down from the $115 that has been charged per ton of material.

The news was even better on the cardboard front, where soiled and waxed cardboard is accepted at no charge, along with clean, recyclable cardboard.

• Bob Wallas was frustrated in his attempts to get someone from government to get rid of several decomposing, industrial-sized  metal containers of a caustic solvent he found dumped in the bush.

Wallas  was walking his dogs about 50 metres down a logging road that runs off Coal Harbour Road, just beyond the Quatsino Reserve, when he spotted about a half-dozen 45-gallon barrels with stickers identifying the contents as acetone. Several government bodies investigated the incident.

• The North Island’s Cover Me Canada was booted from the popular show.

Georgia Murray and  her band were kicked off the show on Thanksgiving Day, after performing Spirit of the West’s Home for a Rest.

• Some residents in Alert Bay — most notably the mayor and council — were irked their only bank drastically cut back on its operating hours after the fishing community failed to come up with $10-million the credit union said it needed to operate full time. Near the end of May, Adrian Legin, president of CCCU, requested a meeting with council of the Village of Alert Bay,  a community of about 1,200 on Cormorant Island, to announce it was would cutting its hours by 40 per cent. “Given the current business levels at the location, this was the right decision for us to continue to serve the community in a financially responsible way,” Legin said.

• The Tri-port communities rallied around a North Island woman who faced a tough battle with cancer — the second time she’s had to do so in less than two years.

Jessika Roberts, a Port Alice married mom of three young children, successfully battled cervical cancer about a year-and-half ago, but was recently diagnosed with the insidious disease again.

Several events to raise money for the family were held in various North Island locations.

 

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