A little clarity on containers

Nestle rep responds to claims in Lawrence Woodall's last column.

Dear editor,

I read with interest the column “Earth Day Every Day” (Lawrence Woodall, Our Backyard, May 2).

In the piece, bisphenol A — or BPA — is identified as being found in plastic “food and beverage containers.” Within the context of beverage containers used to package bottled water and other non-alcoholic consumer beverages, this statement requires clarification.

BPA is not used in the production of PET plastic-based beverage containers, which have been in use by the Canadian beverage industry for more than 25 years.

According to Health Canada (www.chemicalsubstanceschimiques.gc.ca), BPA is used to “make a hard, clear plastic known as polycarbonate, which is used in many consumer products, including reusable water bottles and baby bottles. It is also found in epoxy resins, which act as a protective lining on the inside of metal-based food and beverage cans.”

Health Canada further states that “current research tells us the general public need not be concerned. In general, most Canadians are exposed to very low levels of bisphenol A, therefore, it does not pose a health risk.”

John B. Challinor II, APR

Director of Corporate Affairs

Nestlé Waters Canada