Animal Abusers Rate Lengthy Jail Sentences

Kathy O'Reilly Taylor on the topic of animal abuse and the consequences for those involved.

I have been shocked by the local incidences of cruelty to animals I have heard about, or printed stories about, in the short time I have been at the North Island Gazette.

Puppies tossed into a Port-A-Potty and left to die, a rescued puppy with a broken leg left to heal incorrectly and half its ear cut off, and most recently a cat being put in a bag and reportedly smashed against a wall.

I don’t understand.

As a person who used to bring home stray kittens when I was a little girl, and has had at least two pets continuously throughout my adult life, I can’t fathom hurting another living creature for kicks.

I can’t imagine what these animals, naturally trusting of people, were feeling as their lives were extinguished in such horrible, cruel ways.

The scariest part about these heinous acts is what they say about the people that committed them.

In the mid 1980s, the FBI began noticing and paying attention to the fact that serial killers often have histories of abusing animals in early childhood.

Since then more and more research has been conducted in both the United States and Canada about the link between human and animal violence.

The studies show there is an indisputable tie between animal abuse and violence towards people, particularly within the family.

Threats of violence against a family pet are often used as a means of control by an abusive partner. Studies also consistently show that women delay leaving abusive situations because of fears for their pet’s safety.

As a result of these studies, more and more states now have felony level animal cruelty statutes to acknowledge the true danger often associated with this form of violence.

Many states are also adopting cross-reporting laws where human and animal welfare professionals must report suspected violence across species.

In April of 2008, Parliament passed Bill S-203 which increased jail time and other penalties for animal abuse.

However, recent headlines show that little has changed.

Offenders and their lawyers continue to exploit flaws and loopholes to get off with a slap on the wrist or no penalty at all.

The lenient punishments that are being handed out by our Canadian legal system are just not acceptable.

Not only should they do significant jail time, these people should also be required to undergo mandatory psychological treatment.

By taking these steps we may, in fact, prevent ongoing and future crimes against other human beings.

“The greatness of a nation can be judged by the way its animals are treated.” — Mahatma Gandhi

 

Just Posted

Port Hardy Mayor Dennis Dugas says district is not backing out of multiplex project

The district will be holding a multiplex open house session Jan.29 at 6:30 p.m. at the Civic Centre.

Port Alice trailer goes up in flames in the early morning hours

The North Island Gazette will continue to update the story with more details as it progresses.

1041 customers without power due to outages in Northern Vancouver Island

Keep following the North Island Gazette for more on the power outages.

VIDEO: Sports Talk with Tyson: North Island Bantam Eagles are ready for provincials

Sports Talk with Tyson is back this week with an indepth look at the North Island Bantam Eagles.

2-for-1: Total lunar eclipse comes with supermoon bonus

On Sunday night, the moon, Earth and sun lined up to create the eclipse, which was visible throughout North and South America

No injuries after collapsed floor traps worker at former mill in Campbell River – fire chief

Company says it’s investigating after incident at decommissioned Catalyst facility

Teen in confrontation with Native American: I didn’t provoke

Nick Sandmann of Covington Catholic High School said he was trying to defuse the situation

North Island teams play in novice house league tournament in Port Hardy

Teams from all over Vancouver Island came to play and test their skills against each other.

Speaker brings report on allegations to B.C. legislature committee

Report describes Darryl Plecas’ suspicions about senior staff

Suspect allegedly armed with handgun robs Island gas station

Incident occurred Sunday night in Nanaimo

B.C. man charged in 2014 snake venom death of toddler

Henry Thomas was taking care of the North Vancouver girl the day before she died

Parole granted for drunk driver that killed BC RCMP officer

Kenneth Jacob Fenton will be able to attend alcohol abuse treatment, nearly three years after crash that killed Const. Sarah Beckett

MARS seeing influx of sick, injured eagles from north part of Vancouver Island

Factors for increase in eagle cases can be anything from lead poisoning to vehicle strikes

Most Read