Forests Minister Doug Donaldson announces program to preserve 54 of the largest trees in B.C., Saanich, July 17, 2019. (B.C. government)

B.C. VIEWS: NDP pushes ahead with Crown forest redistribution

This isn’t the time for a radical Indigenous rights agenda

B.C.’s forest industry is having another bad week, after Canfor Corp. announced the immediate closure of its Mackenzie sawmill north of Prince George, and the permanent reduction from two shifts to one at its Isle Pierre mill west of the city, effective in September.

It’s the latest of a long string of permanent or temporary lumber production curtailments announced this year for B.C. Interior mills. Canfor attributes the layoff at Isle Pierre to timber reduction at the centre of the mountain pine beetle recovery zone. Mackenzie is “due to the high cost of fibre, poor lumber markets and challenging operating conditions that have combined to make the mill uneconomic under these conditions.”

This is the backdrop for Forest Minister Doug Donaldson’s latest initiative, the launch of an “Interior forest sector renewal” project. This consists of a website to gather public input, while ministry staff meet privately with local government and Indigenous leaders in Interior communities, including those hurting the worst.

As with the series of industry-led meetings urged by Premier John Horgan in January, the key purpose here is to further redistribute Crown forest cutting rights. Horgan and Donaldson are locked into the NDP political frame that big forest companies are the problem, and that nothing has been done about their grip on the people’s resource.

RELATED: B.C. seeks advice on reviving Interior forest industry

RELATED: Stumpage fees help keep B.C. budget in the black

The Gordon Campbell government bought back 20 per cent of timber licences to diversify the industry in smaller tenures and community forests, and then worked through more than 100 timber assignments with Indigenous communities. This effort faded away during the Christy Clark years, but now it’s back with a vengeance.

Similar to the Horgan government’s earlier engagement with salmon farm operators, I suspect these private meetings boil down to a series of ultimatums to big forest licence holders. The B.C. NDP wants to be seen as implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and this is how they aim to do it.

“Almost every day when we’re sitting in the legislature I have First Nations come into my office to express interest in more volume and getting involved in forestry,” Donaldson told me last week. “That diversity of tenure holders is something we think will be important to the vitality of the industry.”

Legislation passed this spring requires what’s called a “public interest” test for any transfer of cutting rights. Donaldson described the proposed sale of Canfor’s licence to Interfor to keep its historic Adams Lake sawmill going as the $60 million sale of an “artificial asset.”

I asked Donaldson if this kind of transaction is a thing of the past. He allowed that while ministry staff have kept in touch with Interfor and Canfor, he’s met with the mayor of Clearwater and leadership of the Simpcw First Nation. Chief Shelly Loring has demanded a role in forest management, and Donaldson concurs.

“I’m looking forward to seeing the proposal on my desk, and yes, we want to see diversity of tenure to create more opportunities,” Donaldson said.

Setting aside the useless political rhetoric around this (“You did nothing!” “No, you’re doing nothing!”), an optimist could say a multi-decade process of Crown forest reform and development of new markets such as mass timber is continuing.

My concern now is that the NDP is interpreting its minority government as a one-term window for socialist revolution, like the Dave Barrett government of the 1970s. I hope I’m wrong.

Tom Fletcher is B.C. legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press Media. Email: tfletcher@blackpress.ca


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislature

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Comments are closed

Just Posted

North Island Elementary students published in short story collection

Five Fort Rupert Elementary students are now bonafide authors

MP asks Minister of Transport for review of safe crew levels on new ferries

The new ferries were approved to run with smaller crew sizes, raising safety concerns

$8,179,919 in grant funding announced for North Island communities

This local funding is part of over $228 million in grants going to B.C. communities.

Port Hardy earns Bear Smart certification

Community committed to living safely alongside bears

Funding police would be ‘most expensive single budget item we would have’ says Port Hardy councillor

‘we’re not panicking — I can’t see our population numbers jumping up that high that quick’

QUIZ: A celebration of dogs

These are the dog days of summer. How much do you know about dogs?

300 Cache Creek residents on evacuation alert due to flood risk as river rises

Heavy rainfall on Canada Day has river rising steadily, threatening 175 properties

First glimpse of Canada’s true COVID-19 infection rate expected mid-July

At least 105,000 Canadians have tested positive for COVID-19 since the coronavirus was identified

Annual music event in Comox Valley celebrates online instead

Vancouver Island MusicFest holds virtual celebration set for July 10

Police ramp up efforts to get impaired drivers off B.C. roads this summer

July is dedicated to the Summer CounterAttack Impaired Driving Campaign

Migrant workers stage multi-city action for full status amid COVID-19 risks

‘COVID-19 has exacerbated an existing crisis’

Okanagan school drops ‘Rebels’ sports team name, citing links with U.S. Civil War

Name and formerly-used images “fly in the face” of the district’s human rights policy, says board chair

PHOTOS: B.C.’s top doc picks up personalized Fluevog shoes, tours mural exhibition

Murals of Gratitude exhibit includes at least one portrait of Henry alongside paintings of health-care workers

In troubled times: Independence Day in a land of confusion

Buffeted by invisible forces and just plain worn out, the United States of America celebrates its 244th birthday

Most Read