‘I’d rather be anywhere else’

With cancer treatment set to begin, Chilliwack Progress reporter Jessica Peters has a few words of advice.

This may sound a little over-dramatic, but I’m currently dying.

I mean, (spoiler alert) technically we all are. But at the moment I have cervical cancer, and am just finishing all of the tests required before treatment starts. It’s a personal cancer, with intimate details of symptoms. It’s a cancer that begins with invasive screening, and when it’s hopefully cured, some very privately heartbreaking side effects.

All of it may be too personal for print, although in my opinion it shouldn’t be. But suffice it to say that I have been diagnosed with 2B cervical cancer, with involvement of at least one lymph node. This is going to take more than a few visits to the gynecologist to clear up, but I’ll be okay in the end.

As my symptoms worsened, it got harder to be at work. So I’ve been at home for the past month. I’ve been preparing for chemo and radiation, which will take about six or seven weeks once it starts. I’ve been resting and spending time with my family, and napping. And I’ve been kicking myself.

I am acutely aware that I’m in this situation because I willfully neglected my regular pap smears for a few years. Okay, many years.

I had been to the doctor for countless other reasons. I’d even been through a breast cancer scare, but still no pap smear. It’s hard to know how long I’ve had this tumour. Even as I was getting more and more ill over the past seven or eight months, the thought of cervical cancer never crossed my mind.

Honestly.

Over the past month, I haven’t just been sitting around waiting for treatment. I’ve learned things about the disease that every woman should know. We don’t talk about cervical cancer like we do about breast cancer. Perhaps because when we go to the doctor and do the routine screening, it’s caught early enough that we barely have to miss a day of work. Cervical cancer is a slow-growing one, after all, with no early symptoms.

From chatting with friends, I’ve learned I’m not alone in forgoing that annual or bi-annual exam. For this reason alone, I’m eager to share what I’m learning with everyone, because as the commercials currently on TV right now say: “I’d rather be anywhere than here.”

And “here” so far in my journey is countless, painful internal exams, multiple trips to the ER, endless imaging appointments including MRIs, CT scans and even a PET scan in Vancouver. It’s meant consults and hospital tours, all in Abbotsford’s beautiful cancer clinic. It’s included days spent in bed, hours spent in a hot bath in agony from the inside out, thousands of trips to the washroom, a binder that grows with medical paperwork by the week, medication I’ve never heard of, and arms and hands covered in bruises from injections and blood work.

It’s given me my first tattoos, three tiny marks around my hips and pelvis to line me up with the radiation machine.

It’s involved tears, but also love and warmth from friends and family. It’s included access to fast testing, immediate results, and caring doctors and nurses. Each note of positivity, each card in the mail, each kindness to my family, has given us reasons to smile in a time when we could easily retreat into darkness. Yes, this is a world I want to stay in, for as long as possible.

In a few months, I will be post-treatment and looking toward a long life once again. But it didn’t have to be this dramatic, this fraught with emotion and risks and side effects. It could have been caught sooner had I been more pro-active.

So please, book your screening and talk to your doctor about other cancer risks.

Jessica Peters is a reporter with The Chilliwack Progress

Just Posted

NorthIsle starts drilling in Pemberton Hills area after negotiating deal with Freeport

Mining industry one step closer to a revitalization after farm-out agreement

‘Police are ready’ for legal pot, say Canadian chiefs

But Canadians won’t see major policing changes as pot becomes legal

Port Hardy Fire Rescue’s open house a blazing hit

PHFR Lt. Harding explained that the organization is always looking for more recruits.

Gwa’sala-’Nakwaxda’xw Nation drafts first phase of passive housing project

The housing project will have 96 residential units for low-income families.

North Island Seniors Housing Foundation requests land from Port Hardy Council

“The foundation members will be coming to council with more information at a future date.”

Naked man jumping into Toronto shark tank a ‘premeditated’ stunt: official

The man swam in a tank at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada

BCTF wins grievance over teacher shortage in public schools

Arbitrator found Chilliwack school district did not hire enough on-call teachers or librarians

Workers at BC Interior mill strike as negotiations resume in Kelowna

Picket lines went up at 4 a.m Tuesday, Oct. 16 at Tolko Lakeview Division in Williams Lake

Fall-ing for unseasonably warm weather on Vancouver Island

Environment Canada forecast calls for sunshine through weekend

Toronto Police ID B.C. man as naked shark tank jumper

David Weaver, of Nelson, is wanted on mischief and assault charges

In Florida, families seeking the missing amid storm damage

Five days after the hurricane slammed into the Florida Panhandle, people are struggling to locate friends and loved ones.

Prince Harry and Meghan start Aussie tour with baby gifts

Prince Harry and his wife Meghan are on a 16-day tour of Australia and the South Pacific.

EU’s Barnier hopes Brexit deal possible in ‘coming weeks’

Britain is set to leave the European Union in March, but a Brexit agreement must be sealed in coming weeks to leave enough time for relevant parliaments to ratify it.

Earth samples show dust from B.C. pipeline blast not a health threat: Enbridge

Enbridge says earth sampling shows mineral and metal composition is well below provincial and federal standards for urban and residential areas.

Most Read