The Kyoto Accord is only an extension of man’s arrogance says the author.

Kyoto is not the key to climate change

Canada is the first country to formally pull out of the Kyoto Accord.

Canada is the first country to formally pull out of the Kyoto Accord. Of course with this comes all the politics of lies sitting under the tongue like salted honey from all political corners.

Elizabeth May of the Green Party says it’s going to be a disaster.

Former Prime Minister Jean Chretien used good old fear factoring when he said: “Next may be a woman’s right to choose, or gay marriage,” implying the Conservatives will shut them down.

The drama of Earth’s climate has unfolded over such a long period of time it is almost impossible to comprehend as humans, as a species we barely register in the annals of Earth’s history.

If climate history was condensed into one year, the entire evolution of our species would have occurred just over four hours.

Today we are faced with several theories pertaining to climate change; there are those who actually believe we’re in a cooling phase, and they may be right.

And then there are those who believe man is solely responsible, or still others who believe there is no climate change.

Both ideologies ignore Earth’s history of several climate phases with mass extinctions, the reality is we are in a change phase.

If you believe man is solely responsible,  this is a flawed thought process.

A secondary flawed thought component, was scientists represented in both groups have stipulated several dates from the mid 90s to 2050 in which a line was drawn representing the no return level of CO2 emissions and global warming.

In all scenarios we have surpassed all those numbers due to ever increasing CO2 emissions created by developing countries however, the same scientists continue to urge countries to spend billions fighting global warming based on their theories, yet according to them there is no return from the brink of doom by their own lines drawn in the sand.

If this is the case then the climate is going to change regardless of our efforts, and if we are operating from a survival perspective the first thing you teach your students is that you can’t fight nature, but to accept and adapt to their new environment.

Kyoto is only an extension of man’s arrogance believing our technology is responsible for this phenomenon and our technology will get us out. It sounds like an oxymoron.

When Canada signed on to the accord, we represented 1.8 per cent of the planet’s CO2 emissions.

Today that number represents approximately .6 per cent, and this isn’t due to our efforts, but the spiraling increases of emissions in China, India, Pakistan, Brazil and a multitude of other developing countries which represent more than 60 per cent of the planet’s population.

China, which was in fourth place, is now well in the lead with India quickly closing the gap on the U.S. — which was not  a signer of the accord — in second place.

Both the Kyoto Accord and Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change allowed developing countries such as India and China to catch up using the same technology that created this mess.

At present we are experiencing changes in the oceans, our fresh water supplies are dwindling and to adapt we could be investing in desalination technology on a large scale to compensate.

This is accepting and adapting.

Or we can continue to fight as the Kyoto and IPCC preaches and keep our fingers crossed that our efforts will change the tide.

That is a high stakes gamble in which we are losing based on present CO2 emissions, but with today’s religious zeal toward climate change, the battle will continue in the perspective of polarization instead of working with nature and climate.

 

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