More seafood a worthwhile resolution

David Minato argues that one of the simplest and most impactful life changes is to increase the amount of seafood in our diets.

Dear editor,

As many of us look at the New Year as a time to set goals and make lifestyle changes, two recent reports highlight one of the easiest healthy choices to make: eating more seafood.

Seafood is a lean, nutritious source of protein. It’s easy to prepare, tastes great and is good for you. Salmon, for example, is a heart-healthy protein that’s a good source of Omega-3 fatty acids.

Despite all those benefits, a new report from the Conference Board of Canada shows not only are Canadians not getting enough seafood in their diet – seafood consumption in Canada is declining. The report notes that fish consumption in Canada has been dropping for the last decade. Only 12 per cent of Canadians meet Canada’s Food Guide recommendations for consumption of 150 grams per week. This has implications for our fisheries and aquaculture sectors and, more importantly, for people’s health.

The Canadian Aquaculture Industry Alliance recently released a report that found higher seafood consumption could save 5,000 Canadian lives each year – and that’s just by getting the recommended minimum weekly intake of heart-healthy fish. By eating more fish high in Omega-3 fats per week up to 7,000 lives per year could be saved. That’s a big number from such a small lifestyle change.

The question for some then becomes which seafood, and from where, is the best choice? The answer: all seafood is good for you – whether farm-raised or wild caught.

The challenge is to encourage increased seafood consumption while not putting too much pressure on our wild stocks to ensure they survive into the future. Increasingly the world has been turning to aquaculture to provide an alternative supply of seafood to meet the growing demand and take pressure off wild fish stocks. More than 50 per cent of seafood eaten today is farmed and that number is set to rise.

There are more than seven billion people living on earth and the United Nations predicts that the world’s population will rise to nine billion by 2050. This growth will continue to put pressure on the world’s food supply. As the demand for seafood increases, aquaculture will ensure that demand is met. That means a reliable, year-round supply of seafood that’s an affordable choice for Canadian families.

Salmon farmers on Vancouver Island are in a unique position to help meet the growing demand. As we know, our coast offers significant opportunity to raise fish, while also creating jobs and supporting coastal communities.

As many of us begin to think about our New Year’s resolutions, eating more seafood, including salmon, is an easy, healthy choice that we can resolve to make for 2014.

David Minato

B.C. Salmon Farmers Association

 

Just Posted

North Island Rising: Minority Rules – Women & Politics

Male politicians continue to out number female politicians in the North Island.

North Island Concert Society reports on a successful season

It was a successful season for the NICS in terms of increased attendance.

Bradshaw’s Photo Highlight: The Merry Widow Mountain trail

“Early morning light is best for photos of the face of the mountain”

Kwakwaka’wakw families march in Port Hardy in honour of MMIWG

Red dresses lined Market Street in honour of Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls.

20th Anniversary of Family Fishing Weekend coming to North Island

Choice of 14 events held on Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands

10 facts about Father’s Day

Did you know that the special day for dads was first celebrated in 1910?

Bombers down B.C. Lions 33-23 in season opener

Former Lion Andrew Harris leads Winnipeg with 148 rushing yards

Northern B.C. family remembers murdered Indigenous woman with memorial walk

Still no closure for Ramona Wilson’s family 25 years later

Monkey spotted on late-night jaunt in Campbell River

Conservation officers also apparently looking for cougar in the area

B.C. university to offer mentorship program for former youth in care

Students using the provincial tuition waiver program will soon be able to form a community at KPU

Cyclists competing in one of the toughest bike races on the planet pass through Fernie

Divide riders looking strong as they finish first leg of 4160 km race

You might not know these B.C. records are public

Hired a lawyer to file a civil claim? Those are published online

B.C. bus driver loses case to get job back after texting while driving full bus

An arbitator ruled that Tim Wesman’s phone usage was a “a reckless disregard for public safety”

Revamped B.C. Lions set to battle veteran Winnipeg Blue Bombers

The Lions’ first test of the season will be a big one

Most Read