Pipeline claims don’t match facts

The Northern Gateway pipeline proposal has been in the news a lot lately

Dear editor,

The Northern Gateway pipeline proposal has been in the news a lot lately as it winds its way through the various regulatory processes involved.  As is often the case with energy projects, a lot of controversy has surrounded the pipeline project.

However, as the debate rages, I’m reminded of what NDP president Moe Sihota said about the environmental review process a year or so ago while speaking on a CBC talk show.  Sihota stated that he helped write B.C.’s environmental rules when he was an NDP cabinet minister and he told a caller “to trust” the environmental review process because it works.

I have to agree with Mr. Sihota, because anyone familiar with energy projects, particularly run-of-river hydro projects, knows that they require more than 50 approvals, permits, licenses and reviews, from more than 14 different levels of government and First Nations, before they can be built.  And, typically, there are hundreds of conditions attached to any approvals: The environmental regulations that relate specifically to B.C.’s rivers and fish populations are particularly strict and detailed.

It’s factual information like this that stands in direct contrast to the misinformed claims running rampant in B.C. during the past few years: Misinformed claims that rivers were being sold, destroyed or drained away to nothingness.  None of these claims are or ever were true, and not one has been able to stand up to the facts.

I would therefore caution anyone following the Northern Gateway debate to keep Moe Sihota’s words in mind and trust in the review process.  Not only does the process work, it protects important environmental values while balancing the legitimate expectations people have for good jobs and a strong economy.

Fred Reemeyer

Coquitlam, BC

 

Just Posted

Authorities call for calm as fires burn near Zeballos

Authorities are asking residents not to panic as several wildfires burn near… Continue reading

B.C. declares state of emergency as more than 560 wildfires rage

This is only the fourth state of emergency ever issued during a fire season

Port Hardy Fire Rescue knocks down wildland fire

PHFR members responded to the scene, located the fire, and contained it to the immediate area.

Second annual Port McNeill & District Chamber of Commerce golf tournament

Golf Holes #2 and #6 are Hole-in-One opportunities, each with a cash prize of $25,000!

No taxes paid by Neucel, Doug Bondue Arena in Port Alice closes

“Neucel owes us a million dollars and it’s pretty hard to stay status quo when you’re short a million.”

Interim GoFundMe payments approved in Humboldt Broncos crash

$50,000 to be given to each of the 13 survivors and each family of the 16 people who died

Altidore nets 3 as Toronto drubs Whitecaps 5-2

Vancouver falls 7-4 on aggregate in Canadian Championship final

Ottawa intervenes to get B.C. ball player, 13, to Little League World Series

Before immigration issue was resolved, Dio Gama was out practicing the game he loves Wednesday

Pet goldfish invades small B.C. lake

Pinecrest Lake is located between Whistler and Squamish

Mounties deployed to help B.C. communities affected by wildfires

RCMP officers heading to places particularly within central, northern and southern B.C.

Quebec sets aside $900 million for companies hurt by U.S. tariffs

Premier Philippe Couillard says his government will make $863 million available over five years

B.C. company patents Sasquatch, the country’s first homegrown hops plant

Created by Hops Connect, Sasquatch hops are being grown commercially for the first time in B.C.

Farmers ponder impact of alternatives to pesticides being banned

The nicotine-based pesticides scientists have linked to a rising number of honey bee deaths will be phased out of use in Canada over a three year period starting in 2021.

Most Read