Pot law: modern day prohibition

Letter to the editor argues that cannabis should be regulated like alcohol or tobacco.

Dear editor,

When prohibition first ended, alcohol was sold in stores in controlled environments, such as liquor stores, and served in bars under restrictions placed on entry by age. Period.

Have you had the freedom of personal human rights to enjoy an alcoholic beverage without fear of arrest either privately in your own home, in public socially or even in another country?

As time went by, alcohol consumption and domestic brewing laws were relaxed. Now anyone, without any regulation or license, can brew their own beer, wine or spirits in the privacy of their own home and consume it there with their friends, provided everyone was responsible with the care and consumption of the alcohol and the law.

Substitute cannabis.

I am pointing out that basic personal human rights are being infringed upon, by way of disallowing regulated individual domestic cannabis cultivators and consumers the same rights as the domestic alcohol brewers and consumers. Initially we were allowed to cultivate our own herb and now, beginning April 1, 2014, we will not be allowed to have the same right as we had just enjoyed and will again watch our neighbors brew their spirits unhindered? In our faces, so to speak.

Why the double standard?

Cannabis — like alcohol — is a pastime. A hobby to relax. Just like tobacco consumption. What do smokers say? “I need a cigarette to relax.” Beer brewers want more selection and everyone says it’s for personal enjoyment. There — our own personal human rights.

If cannabis is decriminalized in the United States then anyone that puffs for relaxation should not be kept from entering into the United States by ground or air from Canada. We are all, as a whole world, becoming more aware of the practical uses of cannabis as consumers and do not believe it should be a criminal act to cultivate or consume it. Thirty years of research and no deaths. Check prescription cure rates of causing cancers and fatalities. Are the makers of these deadly drugs incarcerated for deaths caused?

Once cannabis is decriminalized the criminal element will be removed because it won’t be hard to legally get anymore — just like alcohol. Alcohol is allowed across the borders and is taxed.

Why is there a separate distinction for cannabis when all that is required is equality between the alcohol consumer’s rights and the cannabis consumer’s. And it is a long time coming. Anyone whom has consumed alcohol and consumed cannabis can find no real separate distinction between the two choices for relaxation and consumption.  Comparatively they are the same.

I demand the re-institution of my basic personal human rights to consume and cultivate cannabis domestically for my own personal consumption and enjoyment and mental healing.

Gardening slows the blood pressure and creates focus and discipline in an individual and the resultant plants create much pride and accomplishment in the grower. Very healthy mindset.

Eventually — and much more quickly than the relaxing of alcohol brewing laws — we cannabis consumers will arrive at the point whereby individual domestic (not for sale) cannabis cultivating will be legal again as it is until April 1, 2014, as we will push for our basic human rights to cultivate for enjoyment and safety and comfort, when enough of us get together to push the powers that be back into sanity.

Regulation — not segregation — and legislation is required from government now. Consumers can continue to be useful, productive, safe cultivators if given the opportunity.

Regulated and certified domestic cannabis consumers are no more of a threat to the safety of a neighbourhood than someone brewing spirits or beer in their basements.

As more states and provinces relax their cannabis consumption laws, entry between the two countries will no longer be considered a political standpoint as cannabis becomes common, just like alcohol.

Should we put it to a vote?

 

 

 

Karen Mack

Cold Lake, Alberta

 

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