ROR projects a good fit

Much has been written about run-of-river hydro projects over the past several years

Dear editor:

Much has been written about run-of-river hydro projects over the past several years, most of it misguided, ignorant and misinformed.

Not only is run-of-river (ROR) a perfect fit for B.C.’s geography and climate, able to provide clean energy from an unendingly renewable resource, (but) every drop of water used to generate electricity is returned to a river afterward.  ROR projects are also located above natural fish barriers and therefore do not hurt salmon.

Run-of-river projects also require more than 50 permits, licences, reviews and approvals from 14 local, provincial and federal authorities, along with extensive consultation and partnerships with First Nations.

Because the regulations are so stringent the majority of run-of-river projects never get past the proposal stage.

However, those that do return over a third of their revenue in taxes and fees to local, provincial and federal levels of government.

When you throw in the jobs and economic opportunity for rural areas and First Nations that are created by run-of-river projects, the real ROR story is very compelling and it’s well worth taking the time to learn the facts and know the truth.

Robert van Dyck

Vancouver, B.C.