Where does highway end?

Ferries bridge the gap in Highway 1 between the mainland and the Island.

The problem with exerting pressure on our politicians is that you need somebody at the other end to feel the pressure.

Apparently taking a page from our esteemed federal leader, B.C. Premier Christy Clark has largely dodged the fallout from last November’s decision to balance the BC Ferries budget on the backs of its users.

When the Skeena-Queen Charlotte Regional District recently attempted to get a meeting with the premier, she pleaded a packed appointment book — for “the foreseeable future.”

To the extent Clark is involved in the ferries brouhaha, it is as a buffer between Transportation Minister Todd Stone and his critics.

In her reply to SQCRD, Clark said it was welcome to contact Stone, though he must await the resolution of a “community consultation” before he can make any decisions regarding ferry service.

To their credit, many of the critics are suggesting locally generated and appropriate adjustments to the proposed cuts, including some that are budget-neutral.

We maintain the best solution is to recognize the marine highway as part of the overall highway system. After all, a check of the map shows Highway 1 reaching across Canada to end at Vancouver’s shore — only to resume between Nanaimo and Victoria.

If you acknowledge that as a single highway, they you also have to acknowledge there is a break in that highway.

Which means there’s a break in the system.