NHL expands video review after calls missed in playoffs

League approved lifting limits on the number of times a coach can challenge a play during the game

The NHL is expanding its video review process to allow an unlimited number of coaching challenges to address concerns raised after several notable missed calls during the playoffs.

The new freedoms, however, come at a price.

ALSO READ: Top NHL draft prospects Jack Hughes, Kaapo Kakko know they’ll always be linked

On Thursday, the league’s general managers approved lifting limits on the number of times a coach can challenge a play during the game for goalie interference, offside and added the element of possible missed calls that would have resulted in a stoppage in play before a goal was scored.

On the downside, the first challenge that proves unsuccessful will result in a minor penalty. A second unsuccessful challenge in the same game would result in a double minor.

The league also will allow officials review major penalties to determine whether the call was accurate. Upon review, the referee would then have the option to reduce a major penalty to a minor.

Allowing stoppages in play to be reviewed comes after San Jose won Game 3 of the Western Conference final when officials missed a hand pass immediately before Erik Karlsson scored in overtime. Under the new rule, the play would have been reviewed automatically because all plays are reviewed in the final minute of a game and overtime.

“The theory is, we don’t want lots and lots of challenges. We don’t want to disrupt the flow of the game,” NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman said in announcing a series of changes that were approved a day before the league opens its draft in Vancouver.

“We only want challenges where it’s crystal clear that an egregious mistake has been made,” Bettman added. “If it’s, well, maybe it could be, maybe it shouldn’t, then there shouldn’t be a challenge.”

Allowing officials to review major penalties would have had the potential to change the complexion of Game 7 in a first-round series between Vegas and San Jose.

With Vegas leading 3-0, Golden Knights forward Cody Eakin was assessed a major penalty for a hit on San Jose’s Joe Pavelski, which the league later told the Golden Knights was not the right call. The Sharks scored four times on the ensuing major penalty and won 5-4 in overtime.

In that instance, the referee could have reviewed the call and determined whether to reduce the penalty to a two-minute minor.

Bettman said only 39 non-fighting major penalties were called last season.

The new rules, however, would not have allowed reviewing a missed penalty that led to the decisive goal in St. Louis’ 2-1 win over Boston in Game 5 of the Stanley Cup Final. Blues forward Tyler Bozak wasn’t penalized for tripping up Boston’s Noel Acciari seconds before David Perron scored.

In addition, referees can review double-minor penalties for high-sticking to determine whether the player was struck by an opponent or his own or teammate’s stick. If determined it was not an opposing stick, then the penalty would be rescinded, something Bettman said would have happened only four times last season.

GMs also approved rules to reduce the number of faceoffs in the neutral zone. Faceoffs will now be held in the offensive zone even if the attacking team was responsible for the puck going out of bounds.

Teams awarded a power play will now have the choice to determine which offensive zone circle to hold the ensuing faceoff.

The league also added a safety rule, requiring a player to either leave the ice or retrieve his helmet should his helmet come off during a play. The only exception comes if the player is in a position to play the puck when his helmet falls off.

Opponents will be issued a minor penalty for roughing if they’re deemed to have knocked off a player’s helmet on purpose.

John Wawrow, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

North Island Midget Eagles get their feet wet against Alberni Valley Bulldogs

The North Island Midget Eagles travelled down island to face off against the Bulldogs.

Council agrees to purchase emergency generator for Civic Centre

The loan will have to be repaid within five years, with no rights of renewal.

Candidates illuminate different visions of Port Alice’s future

The candidates were asked if they believed the pulp mill could run again.

VIDEO: Terry Fox Run returns to Port Hardy for the first time since 2016

All told, Port Hardy’s Terry Fox Run raised $2,200.30 with more still coming in.

2019 FEDERAL ELECTION: Meet the candidates for the North Island-Powell River riding

In an effort to inform the North Island-Powell River riding constituents, we… Continue reading

‘I shouldn’t have done it,’ Trudeau says of brownface photo

Trudeau says he also wore makeup while performing a version of a Harry Belafonte song

B.C. ‘tent city’ disputes spark call for local government autonomy

UBCM backs Maple Ridge after province overrules city

B.C. drug dealers arrested after traffic stop near Banff turns into helicopter pursuit

Antonio Nolasco-Padia, 23, and Dina Anthony, 55, both well-known to Chilliwack law enforcement

B.C. MLA calls on province to restrict vaping as first related illness appears in Canada

Todd Stone, Liberal MLA for Kamloops-South Thompson, introduced an anti-vaping bill in April

Chilliwack woman wins right to medically assisted death after three-year court battle

Julia Lamb has been the lead plaintiff in a legal battle to ease restrictions on Canada’s assisted dying laws

B.C. bus crash survivor petitions feds to fix road where classmates died

UVic student’s petition well over halfway to 5k signature goal

NDP, Liberals promise more spending, while Tories promise spending cuts

Making life more affordable for Canadians a focus in the 2019 election

UPDATE: Police probe third threat against a Kamloops high school in eight days

Police have not released any further details into what the threat includes

Most Read