Olympic meetings return to Civic Centre

Civic Centre will see a pair of meetings aimed at bringing the goal of a Special Olympics Mount Waddington chapter closer.

PORT HARDY—Following an introductory meeting last month, the push to bring the Special Olympics BC program to the North Island will continue next week.

Community Development Manager Bobby Debrone will return to Port Hardy for a pair of meetings aimed at bringing the goal of a Mount Waddington chapter closer.

On Feb. 17 those who have expressed an interest in executive positions are asked to come out to the Civic Centre’s boardroom for a 6 p.m. meeting. There, Debrone and local coordinator Anita Brennan will host a session outlining executive roles and responsibilities. Those attending are reminded to bring their paperwork along to the meeting, both police clearance and registration forms.

The following evening, Feb. 18, an athlete information session will be held from 6-8 p.m. at the Civic Centre’s Island Copper Room. Registration and medical forms will be on hand and potential coaches are invited to attend and meet with prospective athletes, caregivers and parents.

Like executive members, coaches should bring competed paperwork. Special Olympic BC policy requires all forms to be completed before progressing with training or coaching.

As an initial offering, proponents want to offer swimming and five-pin bowling to athletes aged eight and older, while those between two and six years old can take part in the SOBC’s Active Start program.

Since 1980, SOBC has strived to provide individuals with intellectual disabilities opportunities to enrich their lives and celebrate personal achievement through positive sport experiences. Athletes compete in one or more of the program’s 18 sports, training for regular local and regional competitions which can lead to national and international events.

These programs rely on local volunteers stepping up to get involved with administration and coaching, training and certification, which is provided with the support of SOBC.

For more information on the local chapter, check out Special Olympics BC- Mt. Waddington on Facebook.

 

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