Tri-Port Wild take 2nd place at tournament

The Tri-Port Wild took 2nd place at the North Island's first ever Women's minor hockey tournament.

The Tri-Port Wild female Midget team played their heart out and took 2nd place at the North Island’s first ever

Women’s Minor Hockey Tournament held at the Chilton Regional Arena, Jan. 9 and 10, in Port McNeill. The

tournament, which was a celebration of women’s hockey, also included two female peewee games, a ladies

game between the Port McNeill Downpour and the Port Hardy Wild, a player luncheon, a Mardi Gras themed

social event Saturday night, and a pancake breakfast Sunday morning.”We look forward to getting even more

girls out playing hockey as a result of this tourney, so they too can experience the excitement of being part of a

team and trying something new,” said Lisa Brown, one of the tournament organizers. The Tri-Port Wild kicked

off the tournament on Saturday morning in great style, shutting out Sooke 7-0, and they didn’t stop scoring

goals there. The Wild played against Campbell River later in the afternoon, beating them handily 8-4. In their

third game Saturday evening, the Wild ended up losing a close one to the Cowichan team 1-0, but even with

the loss they still qualified for the finals on Sunday against Sooke.The finals of the tournament started at 11:30

a.m. on Sunday, and the game between the Wild and Sooke definitely did not disappoint. The Wild came out

firing early in the 1st period, dominating the game for long stretches of play. At 11:11, The Wild’s Mackenzie

Murgatroyd got her stick on a nice pass from Taylor Ranger in front of net. Murgatroyd flipped the puck top

shelf past Sooke’s goalie to get the first goal of the game. A few minutes later, the Wild’s Jessica Wadhams

banged in a big rebound goal to make it 2-0. The Wild held their lead for the rest of the 1st period thanks to

excellent goaltending from Avary Miller, who was stopping shots left, right, and centre.In the 2nd period, the

Wild continued to defend well, but Sooke managed to come back with some offensive pressure of their own,

and ended up scoring two goals within two minutes to tie the game up going into the 3rd period.The Wild

started out the 3rd period strong with lots of shots on net, but they weren’t able to get the puck past Sooke’s

goalie. With 11:19 left, Sooke managed to score a goal off a screened point shot to take the lead 3-2. The Wild

fought desperately for the tying goal the rest of the period, but ultimately couldn’t find it. Sooke ended up

scoring an empty net goal with 23 seconds left and the game came to a close 4-2.  “This weekend’s success

wasn’t just about the hockey games,” said Brown after the game. “It was also about bringing our community

together to celebrate the growth of female hockey on the North Island. We are proud of our girls and the way

they play with heart every time they step on the ice. It was exciting to share this with our community and let

others experience the talent and camaraderie that these players bring to every game.”Andrew Laming, the Tri-

Port Wild’s coach, agreed, stating that the “tournament went great. The organizers did a great job, and parents

and other family members went above and beyond.”When asked how he felt the Tr-Port Wild played in the

finals, Laming was to quick to say that the team “played good. Sooke’s a tough team. We’re all pleasantly

surprised with how well the girls (Tri-Port Wild) have been playing this year. They’ve played with heart, never

gave up, and exceeded every expectation.”

Just Posted

Community support keeps girls hockey alive on the North Island

“A successful program depends on community engagement and support.”

Wilson recognized by Port Hardy Council for commitment to thrift store

Marg is a true leader for Port Hardy’s auxiliary and her nominators feel she is unstoppable.”

#MeToo at work: How reporting sexual harassment works – and how it doesn’t

British Columbians have four options to report harassment or assault, but none of them are easy

One person dead in logging truck collision

“The logging truck was stopped for other traffic, and it was rear-ended by a passenger car.”

#MeToo at work: B.C. women share horrifyingly common sexual assaults

It happens to more people than you might think and impacts women inside and outside of the workplace

VIDEO: Average Canadian food bill to rise by $348 in 2018

Atlantic Canada and B.C. will see the most increases for consumers

Court denies WestJet’s bid to toss out discrimination lawsuit of former worker

Mandalena Lewis is suing WestJet over allegations of gender-based discrimination

Sagmoen neighbours recall alleged hammer attack

Woman was screaming outside Maple Ridge townhouse in 2013

Accused B.C. drug smuggler to be extradited

Supreme Court of Canada upholds extradition order for accused Shuswap drug smuggler, Colin Martin

One convicted, two cleared in 2014 deaths of men in B.C.’s Cariboo

Andrew Jongbloets convicted of manslaughter in deaths of Matthew Hennigar, 23 and Kalvin Andy, 22

Firefighter dies, thousands more take on California blaze

This is second death linked to the Thomas fire, northwest of Los Angeles

INTERACTIVE MAP: Follow the 2017 Tour de Rock

Follow the Tour de Rock, as they pedal more than 1,000 kilometres fundraising to combat paediatric cancer

AHUS patient Shantee Anaquod is home for Christmas

Less than a month after receiving first dose of $750K drug, 23 year old healthy enough to go home

Moose calves rescued in northern B.C. are ‘golden nuggets:’ researcher

Calves discovered near Prince George in late May. Mother had been killed by a car

Most Read