EI premiums to fall in 2020 for workers and employers

As of Jan. 1, the premium for individual workers will drop four cents per $100 of insurable earnings

Minister of Finance Bill Morneau and Minister of Middle Class Prosperity and Associate Minister of Finance Mona Fortier make an announcement on lowering taxes for the middle class in the Foyer of the House of Commons on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, on Monday, Dec. 9, 2019. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang)

Canadian workers and employers will enjoy a slight decrease in employment insurance premiums in the new year, resulting in about $1.1 billion in total reductions in 2020.

Starting on Jan. 1, the premium for individual workers will be $1.58 per $100 of insurable earnings while their employers will pay $2.21 per $100 of the workers’ insurable earnings.

Employment and Social Development Canada, which administers the program, says that’s a decrease of four cents per $100 for workers and six cents per $100 for employers compared with the 2019 rates.

The annual EI adjustments also include an $1,100 increase in the maximum insurable earnings, which will be $54,200 in 2020.

As a result of adjustments, the maximum annual EI contribution for a worker will fall by $3.86 to $856.36 and employers’ maximum contribution will fall $5.41 to $1,198.90 per employee.

For self-employed Canadians who have opted into the EI program, the annual earnings required in 2019 will increase to $7,279 for claims filed in 2020.

READ MORE: EI benefits for sick workers cost feds $1 billion a year

In a fiscal update issued Dec. 16, the finance department signalled that EI premiums will decrease further in 2021 to $1.55 per $100 of insurable earnings, causing a proportionate decline in what employers pay, which is 1.4 times the individual rate.

The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

UPDATE: North Island Green Party nomination still to be determined

Moen says all issues should be viewed through environmental lens

COVID-19 has caused many changes for Port Hardy Fire Rescue so far this year

Port Hardy Fire Rescue’s first and second quarterly reports for 2020 were reviewed by council.

Unofficial holidays: Here’s what people are celebrating for the week of Sept. 27 to Oct. 3

World Farm Animals Day, Drink Beer Day and Virus Appreciation Day are all coming up this week

NDP candidate Babchuk a fixture in local politics since 2005

School trustee, city councillor and regional district chair sets sights on being North Island MLA

Sointula elementary school gets funding for new playground

Funding for the new playground comes from the provincial government’s Playground Equipment Program.

Weekend sees 267 cases, 3 deaths in B.C.; Dr. Henry says events leading to COVID spread

There are currently 1,302 active cases in B.C., while 3,372 people are under public health monitoring

Canada’s population tops 38 million, even as COVID-19 pandemic slows growth

Immigration, the top population driver, decreased due to the pandemic

Lightning strike: Tampa Bay blanks Dallas 2-0 to win Stanley Cup

Hedman wins Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP

16 MLAs retiring from B.C. politics add up to $20M in pensions: Taxpayers Federation

Taxpayers pay $4 for every dollar MLAs contribute to their pensions

Shawnigan Lake’s Kubica gets 25 to life for murder in California

Former Shawnigan Lake man convicted of killing woman in 1990

Join Black Press Media and Do Some Good

Pay it Forward program supports local businesses in their community giving

Liberals seek to fast track new COVID-19 aid bill after CERB expires

Government secured NDP support for legislation by hiking amount of benefits by $100 to $500 per week

B.C. VOTES 2020: Echoes of HST in B.C. debate over sales tax

Cannabis, tobacco, luxury cars still taxed in B.C. Liberal plan

She warned her son about toxic drugs, then he was dead

Donna Bridgman’s son died at the age of 38 in Vancouver

Most Read