Should government pay for rural buses to replace Greyhound?

Most Canadians are open to provincial or federal government putting up the cash, poll finds

A slim majority of Canadians say they support government funding to fill the holes soon to be left by Greyhound Canada, but most hope it doesn’t come to that.

That’s according to a new poll released Friday by Angus Reid Institute, which found 60 per cent of Canadians expressing support for the federal government to step in. A further four per cent said they support the provincial governments taking over.

That leaves 40 per cent of respondents saying the service should be filled by private companies, if there is a sufficient demand.

READ MORE: B.C. bus service applications to be fast-tracked after Greyhound pullout

READ MORE: Market can fill in Greyhound vacuum, B.C. minister says

The support for government intervention comes from both frequent users of the Greyhound bus service, as well as anyone who has ever been on one of the company’s buses, the poll said.

Fifty-four per cent of Canadian adults have ridden a Greyhound bus at one time in their lives. However, 75 per cent said they don’t know anyone greatly affected by the service cuts.

Greyhound announced this month it plans to eliminate all of its bus routes in B.C., Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba by Oct. 31.

The move has since prompted a national conversation about the future of rural transportation.

Provincial premiers met earlier this month and agreed that Ottawa needs to act on Greyhound’s withdrawal. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has promised to investigate.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Jay Dixon finishes top three for School and District Leadership award

“I believe it’s all of our responsibility for our schools to provide quality education,” said Dixon.

7 Mile Landfill operations tender closes October

Taxes covering the landfill have not increased over the past 15 years and are not expected to soon.

VIDEO: This is what buying legal pot in B.C. looks like

Take a look inside B.C.’s first and only legal pot shop located in Kamloops

10 things still illegal in the new age of recreational cannabis

Pot is legal – but there are still a lot of rules, and breaking some could leave you in jail

NorthIsle starts drilling in Pemberton Hills area after negotiating deal with Freeport

Mining industry one step closer to a revitalization after farm-out agreement

Mellow opening to B.C.’s only legal pot shop

About five people lined up early for the opening of the BC Cannabis Store in Kamloops.

Money Monitor: Should you switch to a fixed-rate mortgage?

BMO’s Omar Abouzaher outlines the pros and cons of both types of mortgages

Earth still moving in Old Fort, B.C., but not above homes: geologists

Transportation Ministry crews are ready to start work on the Old Fort road

Around the BCHL: Youth trumps experience for Chilliwack and Salmon Arm

Around the BCHL is a look at goings-on in the BCHL and the junior A world.

Proportional representation grows government, B.C. study finds

Spending, deficits higher in countries where voting system used

Ucluelet fears orca protection could shut down fisheries

“I beg you to start a process to put a stick in the wheels and slow these people down.”

Black market will thrive until small pot growers and sellers included: advocates

Advocates say the black market will continue to thrive until small retail shops and craft growers are included in the regime.

Goodbye cable, hello Netflix: 1/3 of Canadians cut the cord

Just under half of households no longer have a landline phone

‘Some baloney’ in assertion Canada’s pension fund has highest ethical standards

The Canadian Press Baloney Meter is a dispassionate examination of political statements culminating in a ranking of accuracy on a scale of “no baloney” to “full of baloney”.

Most Read