Welcoming homes is sharing that pays

North Islanders are being invited to help make their communities stronger — and earn a little extra doing so.

North Islanders are being invited to help make their communities stronger — and earn a little extra doing so.

Welcoming Homes is looking for more locals to get involved with its Home Sharing program, an arrangement in which an adult with a developmental disability shares a home with someone who has a contract to provide support to the adult.

There are currently 33 adults receiving services on the North Island, 13 in residential care and eight in the home sharing program. But there are nine more in need of immediate respite or full time home sharing, and in most cases the need is urgent.

Jane Plant of the Welcoming Homes Support Services which administers the program argues that filling that need locally benefits all involved — and the wider community.

Plant points out that the value of services on the North Island is worth more than $900,000 to local communities, a figure that could rise if all adults who require home sharing could be accommodated. If suitable arrangement cannot be found, the individuals may be forced to go elsewhere, taking the jobs and their own spending power with them.

For the adults seeking a home share the program offers a chance at independence in a safe and secure home close to family and friends. Besides payment, providers benefit by making a difference in the adult’s life, often forming lifetime bonds.

Support can be given full time or part time, offering respite cover. The level of support required varies on a case-by-case basis, and the home is visited by a worker prior to any contract to ensure a good match between the home sharer and the individual. The parties involved also have an opportunity to get to know each other before any arrangement is made.

The adults in the program have a developmental disability or have been diagnosed with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder or Autism Spectrum Disorder. In many cases no special training is required, but some experience of living with or supporting vulnerable people is important. Typically, the provider is paid between $1,500- $2,500 per month per adult, dependant on the needs of the individual.

More information on the program can be found at www.communitylivingbc.ca or by contacting Plant at welcominghomes@shaw.ca or 250-871-7136.

Just Posted

Island Foods renovates bottle depot and cans old bottle return system

“I don’t want people to spend the whole day here,” said Angela Taylor on Port McNeill’s bottle depot.

Yukon man facing new attempted murder charge in Port Alice exploding mail case

Leon Nepper, 73, is now facing one charge each of aggravated assault and attempted murder

Seeing double, the trials and tribulations of twins

BIG READ: Three Vancouver Island mothers share their experiences with multiple births

Sointula Resource Centre to hold fundraising play

The play will “grab people’s attention” says Stephanie Rockman.

Risk of thunderstorm this afternoon for Vancouver Island and Lower Mainland

A special weather statement calls for heavy rain and wind over the next 48 hours

VIDEO: Neighbours fear impact of B.C. tent city residents

Greater Victoria residents opposed to campers voice concerns at provincial campground

B.C. premier apologizes for removal of 1950s totem pole at Canada-U.S. border

First Nations say pole was raised at Peace Arch but removed to make way for tourism centre

Tornado touches down in Ottawa and Gatineau, Que.

Environment Canada says cars and homes have been damaged by severe thunderstorms and high wind gusts

An unexpected sight: Bear spotted eating another bear in central B.C.

Cheslatta Carrier Nation Chief finds bear eating another bear’s carcass

RCMP confirm death of missing BC teen Jessica Patrick

No details on cause were given. Case is under criminal investigation and police are asking for tips.

CUTENESS OVERLOAD: 2 sea otters hold hands at the Vancouver Aquarium

Holding hands is a common – and adorable – way for otters to stay safe in the water

B.C. teen with autism a talented guitarist

Farley Mifsud is gaining fans with every performance

B.C. man who left hospice to run in upcoming election dies

A week after leaving hospice to go to city hall to declare his candidacy, David Hesketh has died.

Tilray Inc sees $10-billion in market cap go up in smoke

Tilray’s share price closed at $123 US on Friday, a decline from its intraday peak of nearly $300 US earlier in the week

Most Read