Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw Nation photo                                Ernie Henderson speaks at the blessing ceremony at the nation’s carving shed.

Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw Nation photo Ernie Henderson speaks at the blessing ceremony at the nation’s carving shed.

Vancouver Island First Nation holds ceremony over carving shed, Big House project moves forward

“We are hoping to make those final decisions to move forward with … the Big House,” said GNN.

An Indigenous community is another step closer to their lifelong dream of building a Big House, which will be historic for the nation.

Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw Nation (GNN) recently blessed the carving shed on Dec. 6, which will the place where the traditional totem poles and beams for their Big House will be carved. Nearly six decades ago, the two nations were relocated and subsequently amalgamated under one name, but were left without access to their own Big House.

Now, after holding a blessing ceremony over the carving shed, the community can move forward with the Big House project. Community members with ties to both Gwa’sala and ‘Nakwaxda’xw were at the shed around 1:30 p.m that day. Many members were dressed in regalia while others brought their drums for singing.

Two of the three carvers, Bill and Junior Henderson were selected to replicate two of the nation’s totem poles. The newly carved totem poles will then be used for the Big House.

During the meeting discussions, many members expressed that the location may be more suitable on-reserve, instead of across the community’s bridge. Big House Chairperson Colleen Hemphill stated that “a lot of community members have expressed their concern about the location and everything is changeable. We could have it at the other place … up at the end of the field at the school (Gwa’sala-‘Nakwaxda’xw Elementary School).”

The chairperson also said that the purpose of the community meeting was to consider “what’s the pros and what’s the cons with going with the one down here across the bridge or the one up there (at the field).”

Considerations were also made about Port Hardy’s noise bylaws when cultural ceremonies are to take place within the Big House. On-reserve, however, the nation may not need to worry too much about the town’s bylaws, since they have their own bylaws in place.

As for what happens now, GNN will wait on a decision to be made on location and architecture of the Big House. “We are hoping to make those final decisions to move forward with the building of the Big House,” said the nation in an online post. The two carvers are expected to start carving the totem poles sometime in the new year. The project is estimated to cost around $6.4 million.


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