Low cost bus passes and new services available to low income British Columbians

Low income seniors and the disabled can get a break on bus fare.

  • Apr. 21, 2011 2:00 p.m.

Gazette staff

Low income seniors and the disabled can get a break on bus fare.

Eligible recipients are those who are receiving federal Old Age Security (OAS) and either the Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) or Spouse’s Allowance; Immigrants to Canada, who would otherwise qualify for OAS, and either the GIS or Spouse’s Allowance and are only ineligible for those benefits because they have not resided in Canada for 10 years; Those ages 60-64 and receiving BC Employment and Assistance; those receiving disability assistance under BC Employment and Assistance for Persons with Disabilities.

The annual cost of the discounted bus pass is $45 per calendar year or portion thereof and the pass is good for travel on the North Island’s Mt. Waddington Transit bus system.

Applicants need to provide their name, social insurance number and contact phone number to HSDBUSPA@gov.bc.ca by email or mail their application to Provincial Services Buss Pass Program, PO Box 9985 Stn Prov Govt, Victoria, B.C. V8W 9R6

Information on the bus pass program and other assistance programs for people in need are available online at www.hsd.gov.bc.ca/programs/other.htm

People with mobility issues can access two new programs for home pickup and drop-off, said Mary Mavis, transit coordinator for Mount Waddington Transit. Riders can be picked up at home for HandiDart trips that fit two narrow time pockets in each of two towns. In Port Hardy HandiDart trips are done between 9:36 and 9:25 a.m and between 3:25 and 3:40 p.m. In Port McNeill, trips may be arranged for 11:25 to 11:40 a.m. or 3:25 and 3:40 p.m. Any trips outside those pockets, for example, return trips, are provided by the Volunteer Transportation Network, VTN.

Regular fares ranging from 1.25 to 3.75 depending on length of trip are applied to the HandiDart service. The VTN service asks for donations. Users of both systems must register with Mavis at 250-956-3151 before booking trips.

 

Just Posted

New Coast Guard radar boosts marine traffic monitoring off B.C. coast

Six radar installations set up for Georgia Strait to Queen Charlotte Strait to Prince Rupert

Port Alice resident a descendant of two Aboriginal war heroes

Charlie and Henry Byce are Canada’s most decorated father and son in history.

Port Hardy council hesitant to formalize question period in agendas, refers it to committee

In first act as new council, representatives were uncertain about formalizing question periods.

Gas prices on Vancouver Island to drop six cents

But a ‘volatile’ market could lead to increases in the coming weeks

Mt. Waddington’s Salvation Army releases eye-opening statistics report for 2017

Shelter overnight stays saw a 431 per cent increase since 2014.

Winter weather hits parts of Canada

As some parts of the country brace for cold, parts of B.C. remain warmer than 10 C

B.C. teacher’s Amazing Race takes students on Canada-wide adventure

Agassiz high school students say they had the experience of a life time

Don’t sign USMCA until LGBTQ language excised, U.S. lawmakers urge Trump

The trade agreement, forged after 13 months of tense negotiations between Canada and the U.S. is scheduled for Nov. 30

US official: US intel says prince ordered Khashoggi killing

Vice-President Mike Pence told reporters that ‘the murder of Jamal Khashoggi was an atrocity.’

Canada’s health system commendable overall but barriers to care remain: UN

The United Nations says Canada’s health care system is “commendable” overall but vulnerable groups still face barriers to quality care.

Unique technology gives children with special needs more independent play

UVic’s CanAssist refined seven prototypes aided by $1.5M government contribution

Kelly Ellard’s boyfriend has statutory release revoked

Darwin Duane Dorozan had several parole infractions that found him ‘unmanageable’

Road rescue near Sayward points to volunteer need

Fire department recruits can be tough for small, remote communities

Most Read