Scott Streiner, Chairman & CEO of the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) and Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, launch the final provisions of the Air Passenger Protection Regulations during a press conference at the Ottawa International Airport in Ottawa on Friday, Dec. 13, 2019. Steiner says Canada may need to rethink its passenger protection rules after hundreds of thousands flight cancellations prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic left travellers out of pocket. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Scott Streiner, Chairman & CEO of the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA) and Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, launch the final provisions of the Air Passenger Protection Regulations during a press conference at the Ottawa International Airport in Ottawa on Friday, Dec. 13, 2019. Steiner says Canada may need to rethink its passenger protection rules after hundreds of thousands flight cancellations prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic left travellers out of pocket. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick

Watchdog says flight refund rules may need reworking to address possible ‘gaps’

Most Canadian airlines have offered credits for a cancelled flight that are valid for at least two years

Passenger protection rules may need to be revised after hundreds of thousands of flight cancellations prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic left travellers out of pocket, the head of Canada’s transportation regulator said Wednesday.

Scott Streiner, who heads the Canadian Transportation Agency (CTA), said officials should ask “the obvious question” of why airlines do not have to refund passengers when flights are cancelled for reasons beyond the carrier’s control — such as a global virus outbreak.

“The situation that we’ve encountered over the past several months was unprecedented, it was completely unanticipated,” Streiner said in a phone interview.

“And as a result of it we may need to collectively take a look at the framework that we’ve put in place for air passenger protection and ask ourselves whether there are lessons learned and whether there are any gaps that we need to address.”

READ MORE: Travel will have to wait, despite calls from Canada’s business leaders, Trudeau says

A new passenger rights charter, which fully came into effect on Dec. 15, requires airlines to ensure that customers can complete their itineraries, but does not demand reimbursement.

“I think the question we now have to ask is, what happens if that’s not possible?” Streiner said, referring to completion of itineraries.

Most Canadian airlines have offered credits for a cancelled flight that are valid for at least two years and have kept billions in advance ticket sales amid a collapse of the travel industry.

Advocates say passengers have the right to a refund for services that were never rendered, with some in urgent need of cash amid a recession that pushed the unemployment rate to nearly 14 per cent, the highest rate in at least 45 years.

“The law has always been clear that passengers are owed a refund,” said passenger rights advocate Gabor Lukacs, citing four CTA rulings. “The deficiency is in the failure to codify this obligation in the new regulations.”

The absence of a refund rule forms part of a larger problem of enforcement in the Air Passenger Protection Regulations, he said.

A February 2019 report by Air Passenger Rights, an advocacy group run by Lukacs, found that criteria for monetary compensation are extremely tough to meet, often requiring passengers to present evidence that is in the hands of the airline.

“It’s heaven for lawyers and class action litigation,” Lukacs said Wednesday.

Since February, passengers have filed a handful of proposed class-action lawsuits claiming airlines have unfairly denied customer refunds. A trio of petitions — two presented in the House of Commons last month — that garnered more than 109,000 signatures have called for customer reimbursement of flights cancelled due to the coronavirus.

The CTA has received a “tsunami of complaints” about airlines in recent months, with more than 93 per cent filed since mid-December, though many came in before the pandemic struck, Streiner said.

READ MORE: Airlines face MPs’ frustration over health concerns, lack of refunds

The watchdog will receive additional funding and hire 34 new staff to its current team of 50 dealing with air travel complaints, he said. The agency has also streamlined its complaints process, introducing a more user-friendly complaint form online along with increased automation.

“We’re not going to be able to get through 14,000, 15,000 complaints in two months, but we are going to throw ourselves into it and we are going to dig through them as quickly as we can,” Streiner said.

The CTA had suspended adjudications on air travel complaints to allow airlines to concentrate their resources on a pandemic response, but hearings will resume officially in early July, he confirmed.

Streiner said customers are entitled to refunds where stipulated in the contract of carriage or “tariff” but identified “ambiguity” in the contracts as an issue.

Multiple airlines have cited statements from the regulator in March and April to justify offers of credit rather than cash back.

“A lot of this has been following guidance of the CTA, where they had come down and said that it was acceptable to issue a travel credit during the time of pandemic,” Swoop president Charles Duncan said in an interview.

Christopher Reynolds, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Want to support local journalism during the pandemic? Make a donation here.

Air TravelCoronavirus

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

An officer fills up back of a police car with toys. (Submitted photo)
Port Hardy RCMP give back to local community members in need

“We leave,” says Voller “but a piece of our hearts stays in each community we served in.”

Eighteen-year-old Aidan Webber died in a marine accident in 2019. He was a Canadian Junior BMX champion from Nanaimo. (Submitted)
Inadequate safety training a factor in teen BMX star’s workplace death in 2019

Aidan Webber was crushed by a barge at a fish farm near Port Hardy

Hecht Beach cabin in ashes. (Submitted)
Beloved secret cabin lost to fire on the North Island’s west coast

The trappers cabin was shared with locals, but kept mostly secret

An Atlantic salmon is seen during a Department of Fisheries and Oceans fish health audit at a fish farm near Campbell River, B.C. in 2018. Mowi Canada has applied to the Federal Court of Canada for a judicial review of the decision by Fisheries Minister Bernadette Jordan to phase out salmon farming in the Discovery Islands by June, 2022. (Canadian Press/Jonathan Hayward photo)
Major B.C. salmon farms seek court intervention in Discovery Islands ban

Fisheries minister is phasing out operations in the area by June 2022

Michelle Lau with donations that have already been contributed for families kept away from home due to the Town Park Apartments fire. (Zoe Ducklow Photo)
Fundraiser started for tenants left hanging after apartment fire

Tenants not allowed back in to get personal items, so in need of clothes, food, gift cards

Maj.-Gen. Dany Fortin, vice-president of logistics and operations at the Public Health Agency of Canada, speaks at a news conference on the COVID-19 pandemic in Ottawa, on Friday, Jan. 15, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
B.C. records 500 new COVID-19 cases Wednesday, 14 deaths

Outbreak at Surrey Pretrial jail, two more in health care

Vancouver Canucks’ Travis Hamonic grabs Montreal Canadiens’ Josh Anderson by the face during first period NHL action in Vancouver, Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Horvat scores winner as Canucks dump Habs 6-5 in shootout thriller

Vancouver and Montreal clash again Thursday night

A suspect has been arrested in connection with fires at Drinkwater Elementary (pictured) and École Mount Prevost. (Kevin Rothbauer/Citizen)
Arson suspect arrested after fires at Cowichan Valley schools

Drinkwater Elementary and Mount Prevost schools hit within a week

A woman writes a message on a memorial mural wall by street artist James “Smokey Devil” Hardy during a memorial to remember victims of illicit drug overdose deaths on International Overdose Awareness Day, in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver, on Monday, August 31, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
B.C. paramedics respond to record-breaking number of overdose calls in 2020

On the front lines, COVID-19 has not only led to more calls, but increased the complexity

Chartwell Malaspina Care Residence in Nanaimo. (News Bulletin file photo)
Two Nanaimo care-home residents have died during COVID-19 outbreak

Death reported Monday was the second related to Chartwell Malaspina outbreak, says Island Health

Rod Bitten of Union Bay won $500,000 in the Lotto Max draw on Jan. 15. Photo supplied
Vancouver Island electrician gets shocking surprise with $500K Extra win

Rod Bitten has been hard at work with home renovations, which is… Continue reading

Oyster River Fire Rescue members were called out to a suspicious fire in Black Creek. Two vehicles parked at a private residence were destroyed by fire. Photo courtesy Oyster River Fire Rescue
Suspicious fire destroys two vehicles at Vancouver Island residence

Oyster River Fire Rescue personnel were dispatched to a fire at a… Continue reading

Members of the BC RCMP Explosive Disposal Unit (EDU) is on route to Drummond Park opposite of Fulford Habour on Saltspring Island after the discovery of a suspicious cylindrical-shaped device. (Google/Screencap)
Bomb disposal unit en route to Salt Spring Island after suspicious device found in park

Police say a resident discovered the device Wednesday morning in Drummond Park opposite BC Ferries terminal

Seven streets in downtown Duncan, including Station Street, will soon have new native names added to their signage. (Submitted graphic)
New Duncan street signs will be in English and Hul’q’umi’num

Seven streets to get additional names in First Nations language

Most Read