Lazy lampers take cheap shots at wildlife

Poachers in Port Hardy 'pit lamping' deer and selling their kills.

Dear editor,

“The word is out on the street; you can buy a deer for only $60 in Port Hardy!” I was told.

“How,” I wondered aloud, “could these hunters supply Port Hardy with so many deer, and so cheaply?”

“Pit lamping,” came the answer.

Of course, I wanted to know, what is pit lamping? Perhaps you would, too. Let’s go on a pit lamping hunting trip together, to see for ourselves …

***

We won’t worry about hunting licenses, because the government will only allow us two blacktailed, male deer per year, each. Forget about conservation!

First, even though it’s illegal to hunt at night in B.C., we’ll plan to meet after nightfall. Of course, we’ll stock the truck with high-intensity spot-lamps. How else can we trick the animals into coming out into the open, at night? And once they’ve been lured by our lights, they’ll be too blinded to know what’s going on. That pregnant female deer will just innocently stare into the truck’s high beams, or the lamps we’ve mounted on the hood.

This is when one of us lazy hunters will pull the trigger. In fact, we’ll keep pulling the trigger, over and over again, on as many deer as our greedy eyes can see exiting the forest.

“Hey, what a rush! Let’s keep hunting every night the rest of the the week, and maybe next week, too!” one of our enthused friends will suggest.

“Yeah, once we’ve hunted out an area we can move on to new territory. After all, the North Island is big enough. Just think of all the easy money we can make, super fast!” another friend will exclaim.

***

So, I ask the reader, are you in?

“No!” you say. “My ancestors were brave hunters, who respected the wildlife our Creator gave us to manage. He wants the deer to take care of our people for generation upon generation.”

And so, I respect you. You know deep in the conscience our Creator gave us, that pit lamping is not only illegal, but immoral and destructive. You are among many of the good and caring folks who are sad and angry at what you may have seen and heard lately.

Maybe you have bought a deer for $60 from someone in Port Hardy. Or maybe you’ve seen something that let you know the reports of these selfish, mass killings are true. If so, then please phone the conservation officer.

The toll-free line is safe, for all who want to remain anonymous. Those who use our wildlife for a few quick bucks are robbing the whole community, as well as our children’s children. Don’t delay! Call today, to save our wildlife.

Please call: 1-877-952-RAPP (7277). Remember, your anonymity will be protected. With a heavy, but hopeful heart,

Marie Monette

Coal Harbour

 

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