North Island Secondary School teacher John Bramham

Students ‘work out’ at NISS

NISS's Andrew Mitchell discusses the new Independent Directed Studies course, which supplies flexibility to students.

As any student could tell you, there is more to learning than simply sitting in class. English, Science, History — all these things are important, but they represent only one aspect of a student’s education. As the school curriculum evolves, there will be more chances to bring outside components — interests, hobbies, and the like —- into one’s formal education. An example of this progression that is already available at NISS and across the province is Independent Directed Studies.

Independent Directed Studies allows students, under the guidance of a supervisor at the school and with the principal’s approval, to design their own learning. Working toward the Prescribed Learning Outcomes (PLOs) of traditional courses, students can take on a project and earn elective credits required for graduation. While the amount of credits varies, students are still able to bridge the gap between formal and informal learning and explore their interests.

While working with PLOs sounds limiting, there is a huge range of options to work with. Ideally, supervisors and students can design a project that benefits not only the student, but the school or community at large. And several of these Independent Directed Studies projects have been completed or on ongoing at NISS.

In one such project, two students are redoing the school’s central courtyard for credits in landscaping. Another built a combination greenhouse and shed on contract for Cheslakees School to earn credits in carpentry. Two students earned credits in Marketing and Business, respectively, while doing promotional work and other projects for the school’s Connections program. Finally, one student is writing the NISS News column for the Gazette and producing a Grade 12 yearbook for credits in journalism and design.

Independent Directed Studies is one of the many exciting changes to the ways students learn at school. Blending the two aspects of learning allows for engagement and results not possible in traditional formats.

As education continues to evolve, options like Independent Directed Studies give students the chance to customize their learning, making it more rewarding and truly their own.

Andrew Mitchell is a Grade 12 student at North Island Secondary School and an award-winning photographer.

 

Just Posted

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Tier 3 Bantam Championships

“The packed arena and electricity within was fantastic.”

Port Hardy RCMP issues warning about recent overdose

“Our primary concern is public safety. We are urging the public to be aware of what is circulating.”

Port Hardy RCMP looking for volunteers who are interested in public safety

“The volunteer program will include community and crime prevention programs”

Suspicious fire in Alert Bay burns two homes, spreads to nearby bush

Police say underage suspects have been identified

VIDEO: North Island Bantam Eagles tie Dawson Creek Canucks in front of massive hometown crowd in Port Hardy

The Tier 3 Bantam Championships continued in style last night at the Don Cruickshank Memorial Arena.

Sparks fly as SUV speeds down wrong side of Highway 1 trying to flee RCMP

Captured on video, the vehicle headed westbound against oncoming traffic before crashing

Trudeau calls May 6 byelection for B.C. riding of Nanaimo-Ladysmith

The riding opened up when Sheila Malcolmson resigned in January

Calgary captain has 3 points as Flames torch Canucks 3-1

Giordano leads way as Alberta side cracks 100-point plateau

Fire crews battle large blaze at Courtenay hostel

Courtenay Fire Chief Don Bardonnex said nobody was injured

1,300 cruise ship passengers rescued by helicopter amid storm off Norway’s coast

Rescue teams with helicopters and boats were sent to evacuate the cruise ship under extremely difficult circumstances

B.C. university to offer first graduate program on mindfulness in Canada

University of the Fraser Valley says the mostly-online program focuses on self-care and well being

Province announces $18.6 million for B.C. Search and Rescue

The funding, spread over three years, to pay for operations, equipment, and training

Late-season wave of the flu makes its round in B.C.

BC Centre for Disease Control reported 50 per cent jump in flu cases in first weeks of March

Tofino’s housing crisis causing some to seek shelter at the local hospital

Tofino’s housing crisis is pushing the town’s ‘hidden homeless’ population into the forefront.

Most Read